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craig johnston
07-29-2007, 04:07 PM
i've recently been struck by the number of german words which are not translatable into english, everyone knows about schadenfreude, but here are some of my other favourites:

begeistert - is usually translated as enthusiasm, but it is much more than that. the geist is the soul/spirit, and the word implies that you are so into something that it has entered your soul.

ausstrahlung - it's how you express your inner personality in public, it has to do with glowing, beaming, giving off rays of light, it's fantastic and wonderful and impossible to translate into english. if you describe someone as having a nice ausstrahlung, it's like saying they are charismatic and attractive in some way that isn't necessarily physical, but is extremely positive.

feierabend - celebration evening. it means the end of the working day, time to relax and have fun, especially on fridays of course. who said the germans were serious?

maybe you know some more stephi? anyone else know any words in other languages which could fill a gap which english fails to reach?

:)

auntie aubrey
07-29-2007, 04:24 PM
my personal favorite:

satori (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satori)

Satori is a Japanese Buddhist term for enlightenment. The word literally means "understanding". It is sometimes loosely used interchangeably with Kensho, but Kensho refers to the first perception of the Buddha-Nature or True-Nature, sometimes referred to as "awakening". Kensho is not a permanent state of enlightenment, but rather a clear glimpse of the true nature of creation. Satori on the other hand refers to "deep" or lasting enlightenment. According to D. T. Suzuki, "Satori is the raison d'etre of Zen, without which Zen is no Zen. Therefore every contrivance, disciplinary and doctrinal, is directed towards satori."[1] Satori can be found in every moment of life, it is wrapped in all daily activities, its goal to unwrap them to see satori.

As an analogy, we may think of a baby when it first walks. After much effort, it stands upright, finds its balance and walks a few steps (kensho), then falls. After continued effort the child will one day find that it is able to walk all the time (satori).

brightpearl
07-29-2007, 04:49 PM
There's a word in Russian that means tourist sites, like landmarks you'd take a visitor to. I'm too lazy to crack out the Cyrillic at the moment, but it hardly matters -- It's 8 syllables and I understand it's translated syllable by syllable from German. Maybe you or Stephi know it?

T.I.P.
07-29-2007, 04:50 PM
There is a very nice expression in french "être bien dans sa peau" which literally means 'to be well in one's skin'. It has no equivalent (that I know of) in English. It translates a sense of well being, and inner peace. Usually when we refer to adolescents we say that they are not "bien dans leur peau" because they are in a constant state of restless agitation.

On a another level, being "bien dans sa peau" implies that at the present moment your mind is in your body and not wandering somewhere else. You are here, and you feel well.

:)

brightpearl
07-29-2007, 04:52 PM
^We say that, don't we? "Comfortable in your own skin", isn't it? I know smidges of several languages, and I get confused sometimes...

craig johnston
07-29-2007, 04:59 PM
pearly - don't we just say sights? as in, 'i'm gonna show you the sights of novosibirsk baby!'

satori and feierabend = nirvana

brightpearl
07-29-2007, 05:04 PM
^Yes, but I'm told there's a hella long word in German that is good for trivia purposes...:D

auntie aubrey
07-29-2007, 06:04 PM
floccinoccinihilipilification.

brightpearl
07-29-2007, 06:14 PM
Not sure of its accuracy, but this article (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/4294160.stm) is fun. Here's most of the text.
1. "My favourite is the French 'l'esprit d'escalier', or spirit of the staircase. This is used to describe the precise moment a person comes up with a clever retort to an embarrassing insult. It is usually after leaving the party, and walking down the stairs that the quip comes to mind."
Lee, Wellington, New Zealand
2. "In Chinese if you tell a man they 'dai Lu maozi', meaning 'he wears the green hat', it means that his wife is sleeping with someone else."
Zac Teehan, Fredericton
3. "It's weird that English doesn't have words for 'vorgestern' (the day before yesterday) and 'ubermorgen' (the day after tomorrow)."
Anke, Germany
4. "I think my favourite word, and not for its literal meaning, is the Spanish 'puente' meaning bridge. Unlike ourselves, they cleverly place their bank holidays on a Tuesday so that Monday will, on most occasions, be treated as a bridge day (an extra day of holiday) ensuring a four day weekend. Ah, the Mediterranean lifestyle..."
Gary Walker, Barcelona
5. "My favourite is 'faire du leche-vitrines' which literally means 'to lick the windows' and translates as window-shopping.
Phil, in France
6. "I have a soft spot for the German 'luftkissenfahrzeug'. The literal translation being 'air cushion vehicle', but to you and I it is the simple 'hovercraft'."
Jude , Birmingham, UK
7. "In Cyprus, the instrument used to remove staples from paper is termed a 'petalouda', literally translated into 'butterfly'. Go figure."
Jasmine, Nicosia, Cyprus
8. "In Japanese, 'amakudari', literally descent from heaven, describes the phenomenon of being employed by a firm in an industry one has previously, as a government bureaucrat, been involved in regulating."
Jack L. Yohay, Nabari, Mie-ken, Japan
9. "My favourite is the Spanish for handcuffs...'esposas'...mi esposa means 'my wife'. So 'mi esposa, mis esposas' means 'my wife, my handcuffs'."
Ben, Bristol, UK
10. "In Arabic an electrical plug adapter that allows more than one plug to be plugged into the same socket is known as a 'harami', literally a thief."
Brian, Jeddah
11. "There are a few more interesting German words such as 'handschuhschneeballwerfer', which means somebody, who wears gloves to throw snow balls. It is used in general for all cowards."
Bernie, Duesseldorf
12. "In Romania 'pune-ti pofta-n cui' (literally - hang your craving in a nail on the wall) means to forget about getting something."
Gabriel, Bucharest, Romania
13. "In Japan we call a balding man's comb over a 'bar code'."
Kevin, Tokyo
14. "The Fuegians (from Tierra del Fuego) have a succinct word - 'mamihlapinatapai' and it means 'two people looking at each other each hoping the other will do what both desire but neither is willing to do'."
Zephyrus, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
15. "So far as I'm aware, no other language has anything equivalent to the Icelandic 'setja upp gestaspjot', a verbal phrase denoting the action taken by a cat when cleaning itself, with its body curled tightly in a circle and one back leg sticking directly up in the air. Literally it means 'put up a guest-spear' and when a cat was seen doing this it was supposed to indicate that visitors would be turning up."
Nicholas Jones, Cambridge, England
(OMG I am moving to Iceland based solely on the existance of that word.)
16. "I'm a student of the Ubykh language, which has a word - 'qaamch'ip'q'i' - that means 'a filigree metal ornament on the handle of a whip'. It's also an idiomatic term for someone whose good or kind outward appearance is deceptive."
Rohan Fenwick, Brisbane, Australia
17. "My favourite used to regularly appear on Austrian traffic reports - 'geisterfahrer' or 'ghost driver' - one travelling the wrong way up an autobahn."
Eric Pritchard, Clevedon, UK
18. "In Venezuela we have 'culebra', literally snake, but meaning a long, morbid, sentimental soap opera. 'My wife is watching the snake,' means that she is watching the soap opera."
Ivan, Caracas, Venezuela
19. "From Flemish: 'iets door de vingers kijken', literally it means looking at something through the fingers, allowing something illegal or incorrect to happen by conscious inaction."
Wouter Vandersypen, Washington DC
20. "As a native German one of my all-time favourites is the word 'gemutlich' - impossible to translate directly."
Jessica, Nottingham, UK

Hyakujo's Fox
07-29-2007, 06:16 PM
and where would we be without wabisabi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabisabi)?

auntie aubrey
07-29-2007, 07:03 PM
20. "As a native German one of my all-time favourites is the word 'gemutlich' - impossible to translate directly."
Jessica, Nottingham, UK

copout!

lukkucairi
07-29-2007, 08:11 PM
I could not be without all sorts of words from the Meaning of Liff:

grimbister - a block of cars on the freeway all moving at exactly the speed limit because one of them is a police car

I got caught in a grimbister just south of Ogden. It didn't break up until North Salt Lake!

jalingo - a kind of joyous scattering - e.g. the alacrity with which the grimbister breaks up after the police car exits the freeway

He threw breadcrumbs at the pigeons with utter jalingo

acklins - those weird tingles you get in parts of your body while you're scratching other parts

When I scratch the back of my knee, I get acklins in my left eyebrow.

Tunesmith
07-30-2007, 02:23 AM
awesome thread, craig! I've loved linguistics for a while, but unfortunately only one example comes to mind. it's my favorite, though:

yokomeshi:

In Japanese, "yoko" means "horizontal", and "meshi" means "rice", so together they literally mean "a meal eaten sideways". It's used as a description for the stress that comes

lukkucairi
07-30-2007, 02:28 AM
grabalicious (also, gravalicious)

caribbean idiom: greedy, rapacious.

Anna
07-30-2007, 02:39 AM
kuri
aka curry

Stephi_B
07-30-2007, 05:50 AM
There's a word in Russian that means tourist sites, like landmarks you'd take a visitor to. I'm too lazy to crack out the Cyrillic at the moment, but it hardly matters -- It's 8 syllables and I understand it's translated syllable by syllable from German. Maybe you or Stephi know it?

My colleague has just written it up for me:

dostoprimechatelnosti --> Sehenswürdigkeit i.e. something worth seeing)

Stephi_B
07-30-2007, 06:29 AM
Cool thread! :)

Actually German would be a wonderful language - if it weren't that most of my fellow country(wo)men speak it in such a hard sounding way.

The word Augenblick (can mean among others: moment, instant, wink, jiffy) is beautiful and interesting imo. The translation is eye-view, and this doubling of 'to see' thus includes an active, if not intense, partaking in the referred to 'moment'.

Sehnsucht / sehnsüchtig is another good one, LEO dictionary offers 'aspiration', 'longing' and 'yearning'. But besides 'sehnen' (longing, wishing, yearning) the word also contains 'suchen' (searching), but in the same way 'Sucht' / 'süchtig' (addiction, addicted). No wonder it was quite the keyword of Romanticism.

One of my favourite words is the old-fashioned Kleinod (actually it got voted for as most beautiful endangered German word this year --> a link (http://www.dw-world.de/popups/popup_imagegalleryimage/0,2180,2615222_gid_2235205_lang_2_page_1,00.html)) . It means little-property and the trivial meaning is treasure or gem. But a Kleinod can be basically anything, not necessary precious materially or in the eyes of other people.

Something one cannot translate is the Brazilian-Portuguese tudo bem (all is good, it's alright) as it sums up the total Brazilian philosophy of life in two words. The freshly graduated Brazilian engineer who used to live at our place some months when I was a kid (my stepfather #1 had picked her up at a highway stop, oh he actually often did pick up people and bring them home... not totally selfless in her case - he had a construction firm back then ;)) tried to explain us. But I suppose you have to be born and bred Brazilian to really get the gist.

brightpearl
07-30-2007, 07:24 AM
dostoprimechatelnosti --> Sehenswürdigkeit i.e. something worth seeing)

That's it! I should have transliterated the Russki myself for reference, but for some reason I find that rather difficult. Does that have the same "sehnen" root as "sehnsucht"?

We have both of these words in English, but we don't have this interesting nuance:
Mukha (муха) means "fly" (the insect, not the verb) with the stress on the first syllable, and "torture" with the stress on the second.

Sometimes even when you have the words with precisely the same meaning alone, you can't ever achieve the same nuanced context.

Stephi_B
07-30-2007, 08:33 AM
^ No these are two different verbs 'sehen' = 'see' and 'sehnen' = 'yearn' etc.

But in the connection of Sehnsucht and Sehenswürdigkeit a very, very German word comes to my mind:

Fernweh

literally far-hurt or far-pain, meaning the (painful or at least very deep) longing to visit foreign lands.

You speak/learn Russian? :) Started to (on my own after I saw my time-schedule would not allow me to visit a proper course at uni) with school books (Cyrillic I knew anyhow - extensive hanging-out with East Europeans since childhood ;)). Unfortunately I came off after being through the first ~ 2/3 of volume 1 (of two). But I get my daily oral understanding lessons here in office when Vanya phones with his wife :D Whenever I have more time (oh when, oh when..) I wanna pick it up again. Such a beautiful language full of colour and nuances! If there weren't this six cases (already struggle with our four sometimes :o being grown up with grammatically quite individual Bavarian).

Love this book here: Dictionary of Russian Slang & Colloquial Expressions (http://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Russian-Slang-Colloquial-Expressions/dp/0764110195/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3/103-9161877-8177454?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1185794928&sr=8-3)
OK in parts quite saucy stuff, particularly the 1001 different ways to use the most notorious 3-letter word хуй, but extremely interesting (if you don't know it already).

lukkucairi
07-30-2007, 10:36 AM
I love Fernweh :)

most of my indispensible words are Bahamian/Caribbean in origin - that's where I'm from and where most of my extended family still lives.

"grabalicious" I quoted before, but it's more nuanced than "greedy" - it denotes the kind of person who'll sell their own grandmother if they could turn a profit. "grabaliciousness" within a family is the sort of thing that causes feuds.

"broughtupcy" (brought-up-cy, formed similiarly to bankruptcy) - means, loosely, manners - but more the overall ability to get along in a civilized fashion with other people. If a Bahamian tells you you've got no broughtupcy, they're either joking or you've just committed a serious faux pas.

"boongie" - means arse :D
it's actually a low-level swear word in the Bahamas. A popular song containing the lyrics "shake that boongie" was bleeped out on the radio there :D

we also use words that are technically English, but that are sliding into archaism elsewhere: when was the last time you told someone you were "vexed" (only we pronounce it "wex") - instead of pissed off? There's a popular local newspaper column in Nassau called "Why You Vex?" where people write in to complain about the government and about each other.

"scornful" is also popularly used to denote disgust - "I'm scornful of her kitchen floor. It's filthy."

Stephi_B
07-30-2007, 12:57 PM
^ Love how Bahamians/Caribbeans make use of the English language :)

auntie aubrey
07-30-2007, 01:40 PM
you know what word i need? i need a word that more correctly applies in circumstances when we (collectively) use "irony" incorrectly.

i need a word that means "improbably coincidental." or "misfortunately contrary."

who's got a word for that?

brightpearl
07-30-2007, 05:31 PM
хуй

:eek: :eek:
Yes, that word is particularly...um...fertile.

Stephi_B
07-31-2007, 07:34 AM
^ Nicely put, Pearl! ;)

craig johnston
07-31-2007, 10:55 AM
i need a word that means "improbably coincidental." or "misfortunately contrary."

who's got a word for that?

life?

brightpearl
08-05-2007, 07:54 AM
My son still uses a word that he made up when he was 3 or so:

"actionative," meaning having a lot of action, such as a movie or pretend battle using your mom's childhood Star Wars figures. Like "action-packed" I guess, but I feel "actionative" really rolls off the tongue, and it doesn't make use of the rude hypen.

He also says "hunormous," which is like ginormous, yet seems to apply only to things that are big relative to other examples of themselves, but small compared to him, like spiders and stuff.

craig johnston
08-05-2007, 08:04 AM
of course, it works the other way too. german doesn't seem to have a good translation of naughty, quite possibly my favourite word ever (i can't quite decide between naughty and cheeky).

how do they survive?

:eek:

12"razormix
08-05-2007, 08:21 AM
"improbably coincidental"
happenchance?

12"razormix
08-05-2007, 08:26 AM
.

brightpearl
08-05-2007, 08:30 AM
^You're right -- "naughty" has a nuance that "bad" doesn't convey. Harmlessly bad? Something like that. Surely there's an equivalent phrase?

Well, here's a word we have, but that isn't in common usage:
Peloria, meaning something that is supposed to be odd, but which is normal. It's a botanical term -- say a species of flower should have an odd number of petals, but this particular blossom has an even number. It's a peloria, and the adjective is pelorian.

In Japanese, they've adopted the term to apply outside of botany, specifically to the Pelorian movement of the 80's. It sounds kind of deep and interesting, doesn't it? Something to do with obscure German philosophers? Yeah, but actually it has to do with dressing up kittens in absurdly detailed little costumes. With reference to humans, kittens are weird -- no clothes, they don't go to amusement parks, etc. So let's make 'em do just that!!

The Calvin Pelorian Project (http://members.shaw.ca/pelorian/index2.html).
http://members.shaw.ca/pelorian/pcs03.jpg

I think it's high time we start using the word in common English. Here's a good example of when there's just no other word that comes close:
http://pac.mercyhurst.edu/media/events/215.jpg

Frieda
08-05-2007, 08:31 AM
ausstrahlung - uitstraling

être bien dans sa peau - goed in je vel zitten

vorgestern - eergisteren

ubermorgen - overmorgen

geisterfahrer - spookrijder

gemutlich - gezellig

sehenswürdigkeit - bezienswaardigheid

augenblick - ogenblik

kleinod - kleinood

of course, it works the other way too. german doesn't seem to have a good translation of naughty, quite possibly my favourite word ever (i can't quite decide between naughty and cheeky).

how do they survive?

in dutch: stout.



i find it hard to translate the dutch word "lekker" into english. you use it when something tastes good (food, drink), feels good (weather, soft pillows, sex, anything really), smells good, etc!

brightpearl
08-05-2007, 09:26 AM
^Hm. Pleasurable? That's not quite right, tho'. In English, "pleasureable" has a "naughty" vibe. :D

More Pelorian (regular/symmetrical when some degree of irregularity would be normal) as per my post on last page:
Stepford wives
http://flakmag.com/film/images/stepford.jpg

The one guy in the middle is a real weirdo.
http://www.overtimecomedy.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/henson_tms_season_1.jpg

My fave:
Talking points (http://www.comedycentral.com/sitewide/media_player/play.jhtml?itemId=12846). You'd expect some variation, but apparently the press has been genetically altered.

Stephi_B
08-05-2007, 04:43 PM
^^ Dutch is something like a cute-sounding German ;) Lekker you're back Frieda! :)


i find it hard to translate the dutch word "lekker" into english. you use it when something tastes good (food, drink), feels good (weather, soft pillows, sex, anything really), smells good, etc!

Interesting, we got the same word lecker but apply it to a smaller range of things: to 'what tastes/smells good' just the same, but in the category 'what feels good' strangely only to men('s bodies, asses in particular :D) as far I heard/used it. Must do some investigations on why Germans don't think women, weather, soft pillows, sex etc. simply lecker! Should start in a male toilet... (my otherwise very open guys at work did never use the word out in the open terrain, so maybe one has to dig deeper...) Or, do you know something, CJ? About calling chicas lecker? :confused: ;)

Frieda
08-05-2007, 04:49 PM
we call everything lekker i guess.. also in sarcastic ways.. like when you're having a bad day and just miss the bus.. you can say "oh lekker.." and go pff


but we call everything's lekker

mmmMMMmmm, lekker! ;) :D

Stephi_B
08-05-2007, 05:06 PM
how do they survive?

:eek:

That's a good question! Not only we have no naughtyness - cheeky=frech I'd say - at least not in form of an own word, but most of our time awake we spend with Nabelschau (extremely excessive selfreflection, literally 'navel-watch') which due to our national character all too often ends in Selbstzerfleischung (tearing oneself metaphorically to shreds), Endzeitstimmung (apocalyptic feeling), Weltschmerz...
Ach, already feel this wonderful melancholy creeping inside me again! ;)

But at least in my native tongue, we got a noun: When a female behaves naughty, she 's called a Matz in Bavarian (that's what my grandpa calls me when he's just not calling me Wackerl :D), but it's not purely naughtyness, it also contain's 'being a trickster'/'getting away with everything'. This quality is even more present in the male equivalent Hundling. Actually both of these words can be used in the whole palette reaching from bad cursing at someone to attributing one's total respect to somebody. Originally both words also contained 'morally loose' in a negative connotation, but nowerdays it's overwhelmingly used in a positive sense - so there's hope for the rednecks in Stoiberland! :)

Et maintenant, mesdames et mesieurs, excusez-moi:
Have to watch my navel... not that I become un-German here!

Actually a beautiful navel. Well for that belly above it I should start doing these sit-up thingies again. Should I pierce my navel? That's so out now, it should soon become in again, or? ... Oh, ****, am not good at Nabelschau, do I have to give back my passport now?? ;)

Frieda
08-05-2007, 05:18 PM
^ navelstaren! :D

Stephi_B
08-05-2007, 05:19 PM
we call everything lekker i guess.. also in sarcastic ways.. like when you're having a bad day and just miss the bus.. you can say "oh lekker.." and go pff


but we call everything's lekker

mmmMMMmmm, lekker! ;) :D

THE secret of the Dutch way of life! (unearthed here and now live @ Zefrank) Lecker-schmecker Oranjes! :) ;)

Stephi_B
08-05-2007, 05:20 PM
^ navelstaren! :D

:D

Like I said, Dutch = the cuter German :)

Jack Flanders
08-06-2007, 02:07 AM
Does Dutch have the gender article rules? Masculine, feminine, neuter. I took German in high school and at university level and found it very difficult. I know a little Norwegian because of my grandparents and dad speaking it and have been there a few times visiting cousins.

Frieda
08-06-2007, 01:24 PM
not sure we have the gender thing.. it's pretty difficult to look at my own language this way!


we use either "de" or "het":

het boek - the book
de auto - the car

but it's
de boeken - the books
de auto's - the cars

but that's all we do with it, no weird grammatical rules i think. :eek:



edited to add: if you know norwegian, you should be able to understand dutch if you read it out loud (and vice versa). for some weird reason lots of words sound the same!

trisherina
08-06-2007, 01:48 PM
I would like a word for "amused chagrin." Fairly amused but not quite chagrin.

Frieda
08-06-2007, 03:21 PM
is there a word or expression in english that represents "de slappe lach hebben"?

it's a name for the state you're in when you're laughing so hard that every other system in your body fails-- you (almost) pee your pants, your eyes are full of tears and your knees go weak and sometimes you actually fall to the ground.. this state may last 30 minutes and might repeat itself if a fellow partner in crime looks you in the eye again..

craig johnston
08-06-2007, 05:19 PM
yeah, it's called being stoned.

;)

Frieda
08-06-2007, 05:48 PM
:rolleyes:

i'm not talking about WEED!


isn't there a word for this phenomenon?? i'm sure it's not just a dutch thing to laugh like an idiot, right?

brightpearl
08-06-2007, 06:00 PM
^"Punchy" maybe?

Jack Flanders
08-06-2007, 06:17 PM
getting the giggles that turn into sore ribs from laughing long and hard. i don't know of one word that would sum up this condition. i usually find myself cracking up at very inappropriate times and places. :o

trisherina
08-06-2007, 07:42 PM
"cracking up" is actually a pretty good description. Then there's always ROFLMAO, if you wish.

seebe
08-06-2007, 08:10 PM
I always thought of it as "hysterical laughter".

Stephi_B
08-07-2007, 06:13 AM
:rolleyes:

i'm not talking about WEED!


You really have to excuse Craig on that, it's a girl thing to get those fits from scratch... and without any input of chemical substances ;) (though I remember getting one of these when me and my - male - lab&cafeteria mate got - only semi-involuntary, hihi - quite high on diethyl ether in lab :D)


isn't there a word for this phenomenon?? i'm sure it's not just a dutch thing to laugh like an idiot, right?

sich schlapp/kaputt/krank/kringelig/scheckig lachen - to laugh yourself floppy/knackered/sick/curly/dappled

sich wegschmeissen vor lachen - to chuck yourself away with laughter

:)

Stephi_B
08-07-2007, 08:28 AM
Zuckerhut (lit.: sugar-hat):

essential ingredient for Feuerzangenbowle (lekker!)


Rio de Janeiro's famous rock (Fernweh!) - not that Corcovado hadn't a beautiful ring to it, but it actually translates as 'hunchback' ;)

craig johnston
08-07-2007, 09:30 AM
auspuff

:)

brightpearl
08-07-2007, 09:32 AM
^some kind of aussie health cereal?

Stephi_B
08-07-2007, 09:38 AM
^ well, might be that Aussie health cereals cause people to make similar noises - with a certain time delay after consuming them - than a Trabbi's (i.e. East German car brand Trabant) Auspuff makes ;)

(Auspuff = exhaust pipe - isn't the onomatopoetic 'puff' part lovely - thanx Craig for pointing that out! :))

Stephi_B
08-10-2007, 07:07 AM
innerer Schweinehund (=inner pig-dog):

Our personal moment of inertia, which causes us to be (as) lazy (as circumstances allow), procrastinate things until 5 minutes to 12 and search for the easiest way to get out or through something

The inner pig-dog is always a good excuse for all sorts of stuff ;)

Earthling
08-11-2007, 08:30 PM
The only place a human can truely tickle themselves is by rubbing your tongue on the roof of your mouth. *I'll bet ya' thought it was somewhere else*:rolleyes:
But don't try this, for it is aptly called an 'ickle-tickle'.:eek:

lapietra
08-12-2007, 12:00 AM
Schultüte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schult%C3%BCte)

auntie aubrey
08-12-2007, 12:13 AM
Schultüte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schult%C3%BCte)

what a cool concept.

Stephi_B
08-12-2007, 08:54 AM
^the main reason how they convinced me to go there ;) Though of this Schultüten tree Wiki writes about I never heard :confused:

Stephi_B
08-13-2007, 01:23 PM
Bussi auf's Bauchi = kiss on belly

Saying good-bye to a close person (family member, lover, friend), most common in Bavaria and Austria (oh well, there a bit more loosely used, also to not that close/beloved people - Austrians throw large quantities of Bussis around as a rule ;)).

Stephi_B
10-03-2007, 12:32 PM
die Seele baumeln lassen = to let the soul dangle

Though we haven't found out what exactly soul is ;) this is the state were you let it 'hang/swing/float loosely', i.e. relax, dream, feel good...

Frieda
10-03-2007, 01:50 PM
i need a word for the feeling that arises when you close a kitchen drawer with your finger caught in it


holy ****

Stephi_B
10-04-2007, 10:25 AM
ouuueeeesh-it
maybe?

Bussi on your finger btw if this is an acute feeling!

Hyakujo's Fox
11-10-2007, 08:33 AM
Grünkohlfahrt

Stephi_B
02-22-2008, 12:35 PM
An expression which is sort of surreal, but nice imo:

einen Narren an jemandem gefressen haben

lit.: having eaten a fool about somebody

tr.: to take a great fancy to s.o., to be nuts/crazy about s.o.

Frieda
02-22-2008, 02:29 PM
gefressen is more like munched, no? gefressen vs gegessen?

Stephi_B
02-22-2008, 03:09 PM
It means 'wild eating', like normally (well that's a thing open to discussion ;)) only animals do. 'Munching' is a good translation I think --> you're the sausage expert! :)

lukkucairi
02-22-2008, 10:21 PM
I need a word that means to do something even though you really don't want to do it, because you're so stubborn you can't bear the thought of being conquered by your own distaste

trisherina
02-23-2008, 01:55 AM
saving face

lukkucairi
02-23-2008, 06:24 AM
^ nah, that's when you actually give a shit what other people think

I'm talking about the internal sturm und drang here :)

Frieda
02-23-2008, 06:41 AM
that pretty much describes the feeling i get with some of my ADD brain errors

it especially involves household actions like cleaning or changing the bedsheets.

trisherina
02-23-2008, 12:16 PM
It is possible to save face to oneself. Most of my life-changing activities have involved just that.

lukkucairi
02-23-2008, 10:50 PM
I want a word for saving face to oneself.

trisherina
02-24-2008, 03:19 AM
integrity :)

Marcus Bales
02-24-2008, 10:58 AM
saving face to oneself: disingenuousness

trisherina
02-24-2008, 02:10 PM
I need a word for fatuous dick. Oh never mind, I have one.

Frieda
02-25-2008, 03:03 PM
is there an english word for the dutch "geneuzel" (neus means nose)?

geneuzel is what happens when a group is endlessly deciding what's good. it happens when a group of 10+ people with 3 cars try to decide who's driving in each car. all sorts of useless arguments are being pulled in and you fail to come to a decision within 10 minutes.

it's not about the best thing to do, that would be called mierenneuken (ant fvcking). if you are practising mierenneuken, you'd be pointing out that your opinion is the very best because you want to be exactly right about everything. things have to be precise and accurate, otherwise you aren't satisfied.

Angry Kid Hoyt
02-25-2008, 05:24 PM
is there an english word for the dutch "geneuzel" (neus means nose)?

geneuzel is what happens when a group is endlessly deciding what's good. it happens when a group of 10+ people with 3 cars try to decide who's driving in each car. all sorts of useless arguments are being pulled in and you fail to come to a decision within 10 minutes.

it's not about the best thing to do, that would be called mierenneuken (ant fvcking). if you are practising mierenneuken, you'd be pointing out that your opinion is the very best because you want to be exactly right about everything. things have to be precise and accurate, otherwise you aren't satisfied.
I think the word you are looking for is bureaucracy.

Frieda
02-25-2008, 07:21 PM
nah.. that's bureaucratie. bureaucracy would be mierenneuken blamed on rules & regulations.

any other suggestions? :confused: i really have to use this word at work later this week..

brightpearl
02-25-2008, 08:38 PM
^I think the word you're looking for is "clusterfvck," but I'm not sure that's appropriate for work...
:D

lukkucairi
02-25-2008, 09:54 PM
use it to navigate a starship and you'd call it bistromathics :)

trisherina
02-26-2008, 02:52 AM
You can read this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groupthink) link and see if it helps, but I wonder if this is directly translatable.

lukkucairi
02-26-2008, 03:24 AM
I'd say in groupthink you actually come to a decision, just the wrong one.

If you fail to come to a decision? It's just faffing about then.

Feel like going to Abilene sometime?

12"razormix
02-26-2008, 03:53 AM
to agonize about a decision?

Frieda
02-26-2008, 05:37 AM
thanks everybody:)

the word clusterfvck should be appropriate for work :D love it! :D

agonize about something might be too severe.. i'm not sure.. i've never heard of faffing about, i'll pay attention to the USA and UK guys to check if they use it :)

i guess with geneuzel, the important thing is that it's about nothing really important, but everybody wants it to be good before moving on to the next point. so there's a discussion, and after about 10 minutes people start getting up and go get coffee or go on a potty break, and when they come back it still isn't solved and everybody gets really fed up. i usually stick around to watch the fireworks.

the groupthink link is very interesting and applicable to IT organizations-- in fact, it's exactly what's causing "desert island" behavior in IT organizations.. like the server management guys vs the help desk.

neat :)

Angry Kid Hoyt
02-26-2008, 12:20 PM
thanks everybody:)

the word clusterfvck should be appropriate for work :D love it! :D

agonize about something might be too severe.. i'm not sure.. i've never heard of faffing about, i'll pay attention to the USA and UK guys to check if they use it :)

i guess with geneuzel, the important thing is that it's about nothing really important, but everybody wants it to be good before moving on to the next point. so there's a discussion, and after about 10 minutes people start getting up and go get coffee or go on a potty break, and when they come back it still isn't solved and everybody gets really fed up. i usually stick around to watch the fireworks.

the groupthink link is very interesting and applicable to IT organizations-- in fact, it's exactly what's causing "desert island" behavior in IT organizations.. like the server management guys vs the help desk.

neat :)

It is so relieving to know that this phenomenon is universal.

lukkucairi
02-26-2008, 01:19 PM
the groupthink link is very interesting and applicable to IT organizations-- in fact, it's exactly what's causing "desert island" behavior in IT organizations.. like the server management guys vs the help desk.

neat :)

see also "corporate silos" (http://thecommunityengine.com/home/archives/2005/02/using_mapped_fo.html)

Stephi_B
03-22-2008, 01:19 PM
Jein:
a hybrid of ja and nein, meaning not 'maybe yes, maybe no', but 'yes and no simultaneously';
very practical as answer to questions concerning quantum physics, tricky philosophical/ethical questions, human beings in general and in particularly inter-human-relationships :)
Is there in English (Yo doesn't work out, I figured ;)) or any other language such a word or a similar thing?

Brynn
04-01-2008, 04:40 PM
I think we just say "maybe" or "perhaps" ...

Years ago when Steven Spielberg was directing a lot of movies, a friend of mine coined a hilarious phrase to describe the director's magical touch with handling action scenes, or his way of choreographing busy background crowds to create a sense of excitement, or just his ability to enchant in general - he would say it in a very pretentious German accent - "Spielbergian Wunderscheiss"

Not sure if "Wunderscheiss" (wondershit?) is very polite in German, but we got away with it in English. It's not a real term in German, is it? We thought we made it up ourselves, but who knows? We used it an amused, admiring way.

It privately came to mean anything that was done with an over-developed sense of drama and hullabaloo - fireworks on Fourth of July, an elaborate, well-planned party, an over-the-top birthday cake or anything made by Martha Stewart. We live in different countries now, and I miss being able to use this handy phrase with someone who laughs and knows what I mean by it.

T.I.P.
04-02-2008, 12:19 AM
Jein:
a hybrid of ja and nein, meaning not 'maybe yes, maybe no', but 'yes and no simultaneously';
very practical as answer to questions concerning quantum physics, tricky philosophical/ethical questions, human beings in general and in particularly inter-human-relationships :)
Is there in English (Yo doesn't work out, I figured ;)) or any other language such a word or a similar thing?

the Indian head bobble is the South-Asian relative of the Jein.

It can mean "yes", it can mean "no", it can mean "maybe", but also "Ok but throw in a few more rupies", "you are crazy", "I don't know", "I don't understand a word of what you are babbling" and a number of other things.

If you spend some time in India you may avoid the runs but I guarantee that you will come home with a case of the head bobbles. It wears off soon afterwards.

Wikipedia has more on this subject:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head_bobble

Stephi_B
04-02-2008, 09:09 AM
^^Better translation might be miracleshit, it's no real term (yet, I might introduce it :D), so it cannot be impolite ;)
(And just like saying that's hot shit in English is maybe floppy but not impolite)

I think we just say "maybe" or "perhaps" ...

You need a word! :) Maybe/perhaps is uncertain about yes or no, but jein is certain it is both.
Mmh... I'll think about a word....

^Wow the Indian head-bobble is even more universal methinks :D

Frieda
04-03-2008, 03:07 PM
i need a word that describes the phenomenon of saying "ooh, i'm going to watch that movie on tv tonight!" and being all excited that it's going to be on, while you actually have that particular movie in your posession on dvd. for years.

you know? is there a word for that? :confused:

Stephi_B
04-04-2008, 11:16 AM
^livewatchnetic

T.I.P.
04-13-2008, 11:56 PM
i need a word that describes the phenomenon of saying "ooh, i'm going to watch that movie on tv tonight!" and being all excited that it's going to be on, while you actually have that particular movie in your posession on dvd. for years.

you know? is there a word for that? :confused:

amnesia ?

T.I.P.
04-14-2008, 12:00 AM
"bob's your uncle" is a funny little expression, meaning "there you go"

To make the chicken potpie, just take it out of the wrapper, put it in the microwave for 2 minutes, and bob's your uncle.

I'm curious about the origins of that expression..anybody know ? And yes, i am too lazy to STFW.

lukkucairi
05-05-2008, 12:37 AM
^ no idea, and I'm too lazy to STFW either ;)

I need a word for very vehemently not giving a shit about something.

Stephi_B
05-05-2008, 07:15 AM
^wurscht-egal-ig
(the sausaged comparison of not giving a shit, or so ;))


Looking at the calendar (5.5.) Schnapszahl comes to my mind, which is the word for a multidigit number, where all digits are the same.

brightpearl
05-05-2008, 08:21 AM
^^^Here's what word-detective.com says about avuncular Bob:

"Bob's your uncle" is a way of saying "you're all set" or "you've got it made." It's a catch phrase dating back to 1887, when British Prime Minister Robert Cecil (a.k.a. Lord Salisbury) decided to appoint a certain Arthur Balfour to the prestigious and sensitive post of Chief Secretary for Ireland. Not lost on the British public was the fact that Lord Salisbury just happened to be better known to Arthur Balfour as "Uncle Bob." In the resulting furor over what was seen as an act of blatant nepotism, "Bob's your uncle" became a popular sarcastic comment applied to any situation where the outcome was preordained by favoritism. As the scandal faded in public memory, the phrase lost its edge and became just a synonym for "no problem."

Sounds plausible. I always thought it was Cockney slang, but didn't know what the analogous rhyming phrase was...

About lukku's word...I like "plegmatic" to mean apathetic, but I'm not sure it has that vehement overtone. I agree that's a word we need!

Frieda
10-13-2008, 06:43 PM
is there a similar expression in english for

"een dag niet gelachen is een dag niet geleefd"

which means something like a day not having laughed is a day not having lived? or been alive or something?

brightpearl
10-13-2008, 07:19 PM
I can't think of a proverb like that, but there's a quote from Charlie Chaplin that you hear from time to time...
"A day without laughter is a day wasted."

monkeyknifightz
11-04-2008, 01:48 AM
a word that expresses the feeling that spreads like lightening across your body as you lay with your lover after a good long shag

magdalen
11-04-2008, 09:51 AM
a word to describe the noise boring people make

brightpearl
12-18-2008, 12:46 PM
Toujours Tingo: Weird words and bizarre phrases (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/3830559/Toujours-Tingo-Weird-words-and-bizarre-phrases.html)
Toujours Tingo, a book by Adam Jacot de Boinod, lists weird words and bizarre phrases from around the world. The "tingo" of its title is an Easter Island word, meaning to borrow objects from a friend's house one by one until there are none left.

Last Updated: 10:04AM GMT 18 Dec 2008

Gwarlingo: Welsh description of the sound of a grandfather clock before it strikes.

Pisan zapra: Malay for the time needed to eat a banana.

Layogenic: Filipino for someone good-looking from afar but ugly up close.

Mouton enragé : French for someone calm who loses their temper - literally, "an enraged sheep".

Kati-kehari: Hindi meaning to have the waist of an elegant lion.

Yupienalle: Swedish for a mobile phone - literally, "yuppie teddy" like a security blanket.

Ikibari: Japanese, a "lively needle" and describing a man who is willing but under-endowed.

Tantenverführer: German for a young man with suspiciously good manners.

Fensterln: German for climbing through a window to avoid someone's parents so you can have sex without them knowing.

Stroitel: Russian for a man who likes to have sex with two women at the same time.

Okuri-okami: Japanese for a man who feigns thoughtfulness by offering to see a girl home only to try to molest her once he gets in the door - literally, a "see-you-home wolf"

Trennungsagentur: German for someone hired by a woman to tell her boyfriend he has been dumped.

Momma ko ene: Cheyenne for having red eyes from crying over your boyfriend marrying someone else.

Kanjus Makkhichus: Hindi description of someone so tight that if a fly falls into their tea they'll fish it out and suck it dry before throwing it away.

Tlazlimquiztli: Aztec for the smell of adulterers.

Nosom Para Oblake: Serbian for "he is ripping clouds with his nose", describing someone conceited.

Traer la lengua de corbata: Latin American Spanish for to be exhausted - literally, to have your tongue hanging out like a man's tie

Sjostygg: Norwegian for someone so ugly the tide refuses to come in if they stand on the shore.

Lolo: Hawaiian for someone who would gladly give you the time if only they could read a clock.

Lalew: Filipino word meaning to grieve so much you can't eat.

Nito-onna: Japanese for a woman so dedicated to her career that she has no time to iron blouses and so resorts to dressing only in knitted tops.

Buaya darat: Indonesian for a man who fools women into thinking he's a very faithful lover when in fact he goes out with many different women at the same time - literally, a land crocodile

Chantepleurer: French for singing at the same time as crying.

Hira hira: Japanese for the fear you get from walking into a decrepit old house in the middle of the night.

Les avoir a zero: French for "to have one's testicles down to zero", or be frightened.

Du kannst mir gern den buckel runterrutschen und mit der zunge bremsen: Austrian for "go to hell" – literally "You can slide down my hunchback using your tongue as a brake".

Stephi_B
12-20-2008, 02:49 PM
Sternschnuppe

for it's a cute word

:)

lukkucairi
12-24-2008, 02:57 AM
I need a word to describe the sudden turning-inside-out of your life, and the odd relief that comes from it.

trisherina
12-24-2008, 02:59 AM
maturation

Stephi_B
01-08-2009, 11:20 AM
from aeaeae to zugzwang (http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/~wilkins/writing/Resources/essays/superiorwords.html)

Stephi_B
01-21-2009, 07:56 PM
Especially dedicated to Mr Zerö -- the 10 most beautiful endangered words (as elected in 2007) of me tongue:



1. Kleinod

2. blümerant

3. Dreikäsehoch

4. Labsal

5. bauchpinseln

6. Augenstern

7. fernmündlich

8. Lichtspielhaus

9. hold

10. Schlüpfer



:)

zero
01-22-2009, 07:03 AM
^t.u. - i got some funny stares from nearby fellow employee coworkers just now when i had a wee augenblick to maself, speaking that topten quietly under my breath & wondering what they mean. and now i'm wondering if there are similar toptens from, e.g., ysa's slovakias or frieda's nether regions - i bet they have plenty nice ones too.

Stephi_B
01-22-2009, 09:40 AM
^Me too wanna hear the Nether 'n Slovakias top ten, and also the EnglishIrishScottishWelsh, Amerikanski, Australish and New Zeeish most beautiful and rare and precious and endangered to die out words!!

And today I start here to explain a bit our top ten (for those who yearn for more there's even a 2-volume encyclopedia and a website http://www.bedrohte-woerter.de/ with excerpts etc):


10. Schlüpfer

a word I actually have grown up with as it seems more common still in the South, it is a collective word for the lower part of underwear a woman (at least heard it very rarely to be used for men?) might wear and gets more and more replaced by such words like slip, tanga, panties, ....
It derives from the verb schlüpfen = to slip (in/out) which is very simple and makes a lot of sense, but nevertheless gives a cute as well as somewhat cheeky word :)

YsaPur EsChomuw
01-22-2009, 12:52 PM
^ can't think of any about-to-become-extinct-words :(

Stephi_B
01-22-2009, 01:58 PM
^mmh?.... then the most beautiful and precious words you have in not to become extinct Hungarian and Slovakian!

:)

Stephi_B
01-23-2009, 10:53 AM
9. hold

The dictionary offers comely, dainty, graceful and lovely; but it's really a very old expression which makes me immediately think of a "holde Maid", being a Burgfräulein of course, sitting in the tower window of a castle, minnesingers praise her downstairs in the court, while she awaits the return of her favoured young knight (who is a "holder Jüngling", evidently) who is out to slay some dragon to get her hand.... ;)
I like the sound of it :), though with respect to people it scarcely appears nowerdays (it should!). Today it's still used in expressions like "das Glück ist mir hold", i.e. luck is (constantly) favourable towards me, where it means "(constantly) favourable".
By a quick search I could only find one possible root it might derive from (and which would make sense in both forms of meaning): "Holde" being an expression for a good, female spirit.

MoJoRiSin
01-23-2009, 11:34 PM
cellar-door

MoJoRiSin
01-23-2009, 11:37 PM
^ Stephi_B

form 01.08.09

they are all G R E A T !!
Caravanserai n.
The Superior Person's word for a motel. Strictly speaking, a Middle Eastern caravan park, consisting of what Webster calls a "large, rude unfurnished building" surrounding an open courtyard.

MoJoRiSin
01-24-2009, 12:06 AM
picket-fence

Stephi_B
01-24-2009, 12:24 AM
^^ :)


8. Lichtspielhaus

= lightplayhouse; means cinema, sometimes still used in the newspapers' feuilleton, but otherwise replaced by "Kino".

Hyakujo's Fox
01-24-2009, 12:42 AM
blümerant - plant growth accelerator ;)

Stephi_B
01-24-2009, 09:42 AM
:D:D

almost....


2. blümerant

derives from the French word for faint blue, literally 'dying blue', and is used to indicate that one feels fuzzy, strange, or even close to fainting.... say if you paid overmuch tribute to Lady Vodka the night before and rise too fast ;) In Berlin people are still going blümerant ("Mir wird janz blümerant....") at times, while elsewhere people have never known or forgotten about this particular colour-sensation that sounds like a flower and use other, less poetic, words to describe such a state.

Stephi_B
01-24-2009, 09:44 AM
:D:D

almost....


2. blümerant

derives from the French word for faint blue, literally 'dying blue', and is used to indicate that one feels dizzy, strange, or even close to fainting.... say if you paid overmuch tribute to Lady Vodka the night before and rise too fast ;) In Berlin people are still going blümerant ("Mir wird janz blümerant....") at times, while elsewhere people have never known or forgotten about this particular colour-sensation that sounds like a flower and use other, less poetic, words to describe such a state.

Stephi_B
01-24-2009, 10:31 AM
^oops for the non-editable double-Blümeranz.... the ladder is more correct.



One more and the fine rest (amongst them three of my very favourites, standing aside gems like Augenblick, Weltschmerz, Feierabend, .... see above) then on Monday (cunning guesses like Hfox' are welcome in the meantime :)):


7. fernmündlich

= far-orally, lit. far-mouthly, that is "by/on/via phone", modern Germish: telefonisch; just like Telefon has made the far-speaker - Fernsprecher - obsolete.

zero
01-25-2009, 10:27 AM
namibian khoekhoegowab


lesson no.1 - /, !, # and //

http://www.sketchzilla.com/madlibs/pill.gif (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Nz44WiTVJww)


/khim !nu #hab //ga (let's go to dance)

Stephi_B
01-25-2009, 12:51 PM
^:):)

YsaPur EsChomuw
01-26-2009, 11:25 AM
^^ Who can hear the difference between # and // ?

Stephi_B
01-26-2009, 01:27 PM
^I can, but it could also be just imagined ;)

Stephi_B
01-26-2009, 02:16 PM
3. Dreikäsehoch

literally: three-cheese-high, meaning (often jocular used): "small boy";
and as I just found out the height is not measured by loafs of cheese
but by boxes as the expression derives from the French word "caisse"
for box.... but as any definite height, neither of cheese and box, is given
one usually uses the word for boys ranging from 3 to 8 years circa....



5. bauchpinseln

to belly-brush = to flatter



6. Augenstern

a wonderful term of endearment (which can be used for males and females alike as far I know) eye-star; or something like: star to my eyes ('star' thereby has not the notion of 'Hollywood star' or the like!!)



4. Labsal

the dictionary gives as translation 'refreshment', and for the according verb 'laben' = 'to refresh'; but 'laben' means more: refreshment not only physical but in a and/or sense also for mind and soul and carrying a strong healing/regenerating/relaxing quality; and 'Labsal' is something that offers that to you that;
I also just found out that this word can have a second (or maybe that was the original meaning??) which derives from the Dutch seafarers' term "lapsalven" which describes the action of applying some protective/conserving coat on the rope with a piece of cloth.



1. Kleinod

(the commission who made the top 10 did well! :)) it means approximately "small treasure" and originally was the word for small heraldic decoration elements knights had on their helmets and also for special, small gifts guests brought with them; later on it became the term for small, delicately laboured pieces of jewellery and now it has mostly the meaning of something (which might be small or even worthless to others) which is very precious/dear/wonderful/... (to oneself)

YsaPur EsChomuw
01-26-2009, 03:14 PM
4. Labsal

the dictionary gives as translation 'refreshment', and for the according verb 'laben' = 'to refresh'; but 'laben' means more: refreshment not only physical but in a and/or sense also for mind and soul and carrying a strong healing/regenerating/relaxing quality; and 'Labsal' is something that offers that to you that;
I also just found out that this word can have a second (or maybe that was the original meaning??) which derives from the Dutch seafarers' term "lapsalven" which describes the action of applying some protective/conserving coat on the rope with a piece of cloth.


Oh, in Hungarian there's the word 'lebzsel' - probably taken from German. It means to lazy around. A bit more down-to-earthy.:D

YsaPur EsChomuw
08-25-2009, 01:26 PM
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01468/cockney-atm_1468793i.jpg

What?

OK, I get the cash, but the rest?

Stephi_B
11-05-2009, 03:06 PM
Lotterleben (http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/Lotterleben) + Lebenslust (http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/Lebenslust)

:) :)

(= Lotterlust :confused: :confused: )

:D :D

MoJoRiSin
11-05-2009, 06:14 PM
^ :)
if it were be possible i would like to change my to screename
to Lebenslust
(+meaning krossed of soursed)

Stephi_B
11-08-2009, 01:59 PM
:):)

You may set you custom user title (in User CP --> Edit Profile) to Lebenslust then!
(You see I have set mine to Riechtier => smell-animal, since I do like to smell the world ;))

lukkucairi
11-08-2009, 03:56 PM
I need a word for the hope that lives inside grief and heartbreak.

12"razormix
11-08-2009, 04:09 PM
trust

YsaPur EsChomuw
12-04-2009, 05:12 PM
Is there another English word for red that would refer to living things or astronomical things or metals?

Frieda
01-19-2010, 09:34 AM
^i guess not..


is there an english equivalent of the dutch word kijkersfile?

its what we call the traffic jam in the opposite direction of a car crash, where everyone slows down to watch the crash and a new traffic jam occurs

(kijkers=viewers/spectators, file=traffic jam)

zero
01-19-2010, 11:26 AM
is there an english equivalent of the dutch word kijkersfile?

the scottish word for that is auchternaughtaeknösebroeten.

Coffee
01-20-2010, 01:25 AM
^i guess not..


is there an english equivalent of the dutch word kijkersfile?

its what we call the traffic jam in the opposite direction of a car crash, where everyone slows down to watch the crash and a new traffic jam occurs

(kijkers=viewers/spectators, file=traffic jam)


I can't think of a word for the jam itself, but the word for those that cause the unneccesary traffic jam would be a "Rubbernecker" or a "Lookie Loo (Lou?)"...the idiots that slow down the "unaffected" side of the roadway by slowing down to stare at the accident on the affected side of the road.

lukkucairi
01-27-2010, 09:18 PM
I need a word for an unneccesarily lengthy airport layover - anyone got one in their language?

YsaPur EsChomuw
04-20-2010, 11:30 AM
In Slovak there's a phrase 'You can go complain at the lamp house', in Hungarian '... at the salt office' which means there's no one to turn to, complain to, every complaint would be in vain.

Is there an English phrase for such a situation?

brightpearl
04-20-2010, 11:43 AM
Go tell it to the birds/trees/yo mama/someone who cares...

but this is more for a situation where you think the person's complaint is whiny rather than specifically for when there is no solution.

There's also "Tell it to the judge"...used mostly by police officers and mothers. :)

..."salt office." Hahahaha. :D

YsaPur EsChomuw
04-20-2010, 12:35 PM
T h a n k ... y o u

MoJoRiSin
04-20-2010, 02:25 PM
Salt of the earth
The exact meaning of the expression salt of the earth is disputed, in part because salt had a wide number of uses in the ancient world. There are several different possibilities for the originally intended meaning of the salt metaphor:

Exodus, Ezekiel, and Kings present salt as a purifying agent
Leviticus, Numbers, and Chronicles present it as a sign of God's covenant.
The most important use of salt was as a preservative[dubious – discuss] and hence the most common interpretation of the metaphor is as asserting the duty to preserve the purity of the world.
In the Rabbinic literature of the period salt was a metaphor for wisdom.
Salt was a minor but essential ingredient in fertilizer and so a few scholars such as Gundry believe that earth should be translated as soil (i.e. salt of the soil), and hence the metaphor asserts that the audience should help the world grow and prosper.[2]
One interpretation of salt of the earth is that it orders the audience to take part in the world rather than withdraw from it
Among the ancient Hebrews salt...was used as a preservative, in seasoning food, and in all animal sacrifices. Lev. 2:13; Ezek. 43:24; Mark 9:49–50. So essential was it to the sacrificial ordinance that it was the symbol of the covenant made between God and His people in connection with that sacred performance. Lev. 2:13; Num. 18:19; 2 Chron. 13:5. [3]
~wiki pedia

YsaPur EsChomuw
05-25-2010, 02:35 PM
When you open your mouth far too wide and the skin at the corners of your mouth breaks and stings and hurts like hell, wotsit?

brightpearl
05-25-2010, 04:13 PM
angular cheilitis

funkytuba
05-25-2010, 05:08 PM
schtrabies

Marcus Bales
05-28-2010, 08:56 AM
In Slovak there's a phrase 'You can go complain at the lamp house', in Hungarian '... at the salt office' which means there's no one to turn to, complain to, every complaint would be in vain.

Is there an English phrase for such a situation?

There's a military-ism "Tell it to the chaplain" or "Here's a chit for the chaplain" (a chit is a piece of paper), that's very close to meaning what you're talking about, but I'm not sure what kind of currency it has in the vastness of civilian life.

A phrase from romantic entanglements has gained some traction in other situations, though: "Here's a quarter, call someone who cares."

But probably "Well, you can't fight City Hall" has more of the "salt office" tone -- a sympathetic nod and an acknowldegement that nothing can be done, but it's not a "go tell it to ..." phrase.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9vpOfexDao

It's not quite the same, in that there's no specifically useless person or department recommended, and since it started out as a blow-off for unfaithful lovers, it still has that blow-off flavor, instead of the faint whiff of sympathy that "Tell it to the chaplain" has.

YsaPur EsChomuw
05-28-2010, 11:04 AM
^ That's nice. :)

brightpearl
06-28-2010, 01:16 PM
FTC Says Scammers Stole Millions, Using Virtual Companies

"The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has disrupted a long-running online scam that allowed offshore fraudsters to steal millions of dollars from U.S. consumers -- often by taking just pennies at a time.

The scam, which had been run for about four years years, according to the FTC, provides a case lesson in how many of the online services used to lubricate business in the 21st century can equally be misused for fraud.

"It was a very patient scam," said Steve Wernikoff, a staff attorney with the FTC who is prosecuting the case. "The people who are behind this are very valmeticulous."


:confused:

I like the sound of it, to be sure...kind of a cross between "Valmont" (as in Vicomte Sebastien de) and "meticulous." Very specific and quite apt, given the circumstances of its usage. I don't believe it is a bonafide English word to date, however. I wonder how it came to be in the article? A misprint? A malaprop?

I think I'm going to start using it.

YsaPur EsChomuw
06-28-2010, 01:22 PM
but what does it mean? does it mean the same as meticulous?

or is val short for valediction? meaning we take your money and goodbye

brightpearl
06-28-2010, 01:30 PM
I have no idea. Not in the dictionary. I expect is is a misprint of some sort, but it's a fortuitous one...shrewd, thieving, devious meticulousness.