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l'azizza
09-15-2007, 04:30 PM
Personality development begins in infancy and changes throughout life. Please give me a story, from your childhood, that exemplifies a trait of your current personality.


ex.
When I was about six or seven we had a hateful bitch of a babysitter. One day, in trouble, she pulled me onto the couch and told me I was not to leave that spot for any reason. Soon I had to pee pee, and after I was caught relieving myself on her crappy couch I explained that I had done so per her instructions.

Personality Traits:

-Smart-assness
-Holding people accountable to their word

Now you go.

Odbe
09-15-2007, 08:25 PM
I used to crawl around on all fours picking stuff up in my mouth, barking and growling, pretending to be a dog - pretty much all the time. Even at other people's houses.

Personality traits:
-obsessive escapism
-not giving a damn what other people think

Tunesmith
09-15-2007, 10:40 PM
I used to crawl around on all fours picking stuff up in my mouth, barking and growling, pretending to be a dog - pretty much all the time. Even at other people's houses.

Awesome! I was a cat for around 2 years...then I reached kindergarten and was told that "we didn't do that in big-kid school". It was a sad day. :(

Personality traits:
-not giving a damn what other people think

I totally envy you. :rolleyes:

This doesn't accurately reflect my current personality, but apparently I used to share random facts with people I'd just met. My family has a home video in which I'm asking a distant cousin:

"Did you know that Deinonychus had RAZOR-SHARP claws?"

l'azizza
09-16-2007, 01:50 AM
Odbe,
- at what age did this behavior occur?
- were you conscious of your behavior being considered inappropriate?
- were you ever rewarded for said behavior, say "treats" or pats on the head?

TS,
- do you still share random facts, either with strangers or those well known to you?
- thank you for trying, but let's keep this on track.

Stories, please, that reflects a trait or two of your current personality.

Odbe
09-16-2007, 09:22 AM
I think it was around five, because I used to do it at pre-school but like Tunesmith, 'big-school' stamped it out of me :(
Far from treats; my best friend's mother used to threaten to hit me with rolled-up newspaper because 'that's what happens to dogs!' Somehow, that never quite connected with the thought of it being inappropriate to crawl around her house, carrying my six toy puppies in my mouth one by one to be dropped all over her living room :rolleyes:


This doesn't accurately reflect my current personality, but apparently I used to share random facts with people I'd just met. My family has a home video in which I'm asking a distant cousin:

"Did you know that Deinonychus had RAZOR-SHARP claws?"
I love it when kids do that. You would learn so much more if everyone you talked to told you some small useful fact or recounted some little happy.

Hyakujo's Fox
09-16-2007, 10:26 AM
One of my earliest memories is been driven to kindergarten by one of the neighbours, Mrs Wallace, matriarch of the so-called Walligators. They had this big old black car, like they don't make anymore, and these were the days before seat belts, only the hanging hand straps in the back, and the back seat was just a long flat bench and that's where I was sitting. So as we went round the corner the door next to me, very quietly, just swung open. I just sat there watching the bitumen blur by, sort of understanding what that blur meant, but I didn't say anything.

brightpearl
09-16-2007, 11:54 AM
^I really enjoyed reading that. I can see it in my mind's eye.

I wasn't exactly a little kid for my own story, and at the time, I didn't think I was a kid at all, but since it was over 20 years ago, I'll say it counts.

There was a sort of club thing that the administration started at my school -- a cool kids' just say no to drugs thingie. It was supposed to be, anyway. In reality, it was a way for the cool kids to brutally exclude the not cool kids, and to make their own parents think they were little angels whilst doing so. Yet, they were all still getting high and fornicating like, like...like stoned rabbits. It was like the freaking Moonies, too; I got the feeling many of the members were lying to themselves as well as their folks. It made me sick, and despite apparently being the good girl honor student type, I wouldn't join. At a couple of points, there was considerable pressure from the school staff on me to do so. The football coach, who was this enormous guy, normally talked in a shout but leaned in oddly and tried out a conspiratorial whisper one time, told me it was my duty to join. He said he knew I didn't use, couldn't understand why I didn't want to advertise that, help the school be proud. The other kids look up to you, he said. I told him that's why I wouldn't join.


Personality traits:
-undeterred by authority even when I find them a little scary
-totally uninterested in the letter of the law, but dedicated to its spirit
-stubborn as two teams of unusually stubborn mules

trisherina
09-16-2007, 12:37 PM
One of my earliest memories involves being left at home with my sister and brother, who are ten and five years older than me respectively, when I was two, nearly three (judging by the house in the memory). My siblings picked me up like a battering ram and were laughing, pretending they were going to "throw me through the keyhole" into the midwinter night. I lacked the ability to discern the impossibility of this and began to cry hysterically. My dad came home just at that moment, having left behind his wallet. I ran to him, thinking I was saved, and told him, "They're going to throw me through the keyhole!" He plucked off my clinging hands and ducked back out the door, chuckling, "They're just joking," as he went.

Most of my vivid childhood memories have this theme: extending simple trust with an unhappy outcome proving me either gullible or foolish to do so. I chose this one for its G rating.

Personality trait in adulthood: modest expectations of others.

Frieda
09-16-2007, 01:42 PM
when i was 3 i was in kindergarten. we had to pray every day to this god ornament, a christ on a cross all dyed red because of his blood. all the children had to say "thank you god" if we were allowed to go to the bathroom, only once a day though. god would watch us pee our pants twice a day at least. the toilets themselves had these huge gaps under the doors, you could crawl under them. you could actually see people's crothes from the tiny kindergarten desks. i didnt like it there, so i ran away. i still remember my mother's stare.. "you ran all the way here?" and then she laughed, she laughed so hard.. and i was so confused, me being upset, then watching my mother laugh. but she promised me i would go to another kindergarten, and i was happy :)

personality traits:

- a profound hate of anything religious, especially christian or catholic
- a fascination for toilets
- healthy boundaries and courage to act accordingly (although i must admit i only recently regained this trait)

T.I.P.
09-16-2007, 03:01 PM
when I was little - about 6 or 7 years old - we moved from France to the US. On one of my first days at school, the little kid sitting next to me had brought in a cool looking remote control spaceship on wheels. He told me that if I did his handwriting assignment, he would lend me his spaceship at recess so that I could be the first one to play with it. I did his assignment, and when recess came he gave me the remote control to the spaceship, but it didn't roll very well on the thick cement outside. Two seconds later I was overwhelmed by the horde of his other friends who were waiting to play with it. That day I learned that doing someone's handwriting assignement does not make him/her your friend. It also contributed to teaching me the importance of developing social skills as a means of survival.

character traits:
~ less of a sucker than when I was 6
~ good social skills
~ very bad handwriting

Anna
09-17-2007, 03:34 AM
When I was not yet 7 we’d often go to a small spring fed lake, it’s actually dead now. At that time I had not yet learned how to swim and would stay in the shallow end trying to catch sun fish with an empty bread bag. One day I noticed the children we went to the lake with were out in the middle playing and diving off the floating pier, they were having so much fun that I couldn’t resist and started wading further and further out. I was up to my shoulders when the bottom fell out from under me and down down down I went. I was there for what seemed like a while, not really knowing what to do, but hold my breath as I slowly sank. I then instinctively, I supposed, raised my arms up over my head, the next thing I knew this man had grabbed me, lifted me out of the water and tossed me inland. I fell flat and then on all fours as I hit the shallow floor. I remember my knee scraping a sharp pebble or rock. I looked up and then turned around, no one was there. I stood up and turned all around, but couldn’t see anyone near enough in site. I stood for a while looking out over the lake thinking maybe he went under the water. No one ever came up. I then sat down clutching my knee and watching the blood drip down my leg and trail into the water. I never told anyone that day I nearly drowned, thought I’d get into trouble.

Character trait:
I have no fear of death.
When things get rough I’m confident something will always come through.
I learned how to swim and fish.

Stephi_B
09-17-2007, 07:31 AM
The earliest manifestation of (a) character trait(s) I still have today is something I cannot remember myself because I was too young: The first word I ever spoke was none of the names of the closest persons around me, i.e. Oma, Opa, Mama, nor that of our poodle lady Dixi (who among other things stood non-stop sentinel over my sleep as toddler :) and with whom I shared my blankie ;)) but selber (on my own / by myself) in the sense of doing something selber. Picked it up most likely from my granny who often encourage(d/s) me to do/try things own my own.

Character traits:

striving to be independent/autonomous
quite individualist

When I got older this also brought forth some more inhibiting qualities:

dislike to ask/accept help from other people
a certain stubbornness -- 'I do it my way!'

Frieda
09-17-2007, 01:15 PM
^ my dad's first word was "cookie" :D

Stephi_B
09-17-2007, 01:39 PM
^Now that's a proper first statement :D

tapanuli
09-20-2007, 04:04 AM
Me: Why does happen?

Nearest Adult: Because, [insert simple explanation].

Me: Huh? Why?

Proximal Adult: Because, [insert accurate explanation].

Me: Yeah, but that doesn't make sense because before [insert previous observation or explanation of anything tangential].

Distant Adult: Because, [insert technical explanation sans jargon].

Me: Oh, look! LEGOS! [wanders off]

[I]...weeks, months, seasons pass...

Book: Because, [insert detailed explanation with pictures and jargon].

Me: Ooooohhhh! Because, [insert explanation with metaphor].

Adults in Chorus: Yes, that's what we've been saying, you just had to listen!

Traits

complicates things
makes faces
underutilized "inside voice"

Odbe
11-12-2007, 06:19 PM
^ Fabulous :D


I dug this up not long ago - photo evidence of my early escapades. It was fancy-dress day at kindergarten, and of course there was only one costume that would do for me.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v222/Odbe/blackie2.jpg
I keep seeing all these teenagers wearing leather dog collars and I can't help thinking I must be a trendsetter.

auntie aubrey
11-12-2007, 06:56 PM
when i was four i made up a joke that my family still tells to this day. here is how it goes:

me: knock knock?
you: who's there?
me: bear.
you: bear who?
me: bear behind the chair!

the punchline was delivered at top volume and followed by a spate of hysterical laughter. and, usually, an immediate retelling of the joke and another wave of equally hysterical laughter. repeat ad nauseum.

personality traits:

highly unconventional sense of humor
always willing to have (and share) a laugh. or two. or three or four or five.
regards humor as the preeminent mode of human interaction