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trisherina 06-02-2006 02:50 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Perhaps a photograph of Volmer's brother Volcan will help you make the "right" decision. :p

Brynn 06-02-2006 10:42 PM

^that most certainly belongs on the cute thread. :)

Coffee 06-03-2006 03:06 AM

volmer: engl. volume ~ fr. merde

A deluge of posts, pms, heartstring yanks, and blackmail attempts directed towards an unhurried dictionary game judge entreating completion of the latest word challenge with a descision and passing of the torch.




pick one of mine and I'll burn the negatives Zatoichi

Zatoichi 06-03-2006 04:28 PM

and now, ladies and germs, the moment you've all been waiting for...

The real definition of Volmer is .... obscure. I googled it to double check my understanding of the term and just got confused. It has something to do with the roof of the mouth. The importance of the word is that one of the ways to distinguish charr from true trout is the presence or absence of volmer teeth. The brook trout, for instance, is a charr (salvelinus fontinalis), as are the other members of the genus salvelinus, lake trout, arctic charr and dolly vardens. The true trout were all members of the genus salmo, as in salmo trutta for the brown trout, until some brainiac decided to reclassify the rainbow trout as oncorchyncus because it's native to Pacific Ocean watersheds and all of the Pacific salmon are oncorchyncus. This is silly, because all of the Pacific salmon die after spawning and the rainbow trout (o. mykiss, formerly s. gardinieri) does not. Nor, for that matter, does the Atlantic Salmon (salmo salar), but the whole Linnean nomenclature for salmonids (trout, charr and salmon, collectively) is screwed up.

Glad you asked, aren't you?

Now, as to the judging:



MarcusBales
: wins the overextended double entendre award for
Volmer, Paul - As Undersecretary of the Treasury for International Monetary Affairs, he had so many that the result was the collapse of the Brittany Would international affairs agreement. After leaving the US Treasury, he became president of the Federal Reserve Sperm Bank of New York from 1975 to 1979, then head of the whole Federal Reserve Sperm Bank from August 1979 to August 1987. He is probably best known for coping with the "stagflation" problem where flaccidity combines with uncontrolled ejaculation, a condition previously thought impossible. He stiffened controls and clamped down on interest rates.
Coffee: wins the sdrawkcabssa award for
Code name for one of Russia's least succesful cryptologists during WWII. Moscow's Fyodor Remlov firmly believed that no one would figure out that he always used the simplest code in the world, a simple reverse word cypher, on the misplaced theory that the enemy would think to themselves "no one would be that stupid". The simplicity of his cyphers and his usually selfish messages regretably caused untold damage, not to mention communicable diseases, to the people of Moscow, and severly hampered war efforts on Russia's eastern front, prolonging what should have been a short campaign against the German forces totaly unnacustomed to the bitter Russian winters.

An example of one of Volmer's coded misifs to English speaking underground resistance fighters in Paris;

ehT etag ot wocsom lliw eb dekcolnu dna dedruagnu ta ylesicerp enin kcolco mp no yadirf gnineve. esaelP gnirb esool hcnerf slrig htiw ouy fi uoy nac. sknahT
-Volmer
daverbee: wins the I like this story better when Winona Ryder appears nearly naked award for
The actual Count from Romania that the character Dracula is based on.
In spite of all the publicity making Vlad Tepes the model for The Count, Count Volmer was, in actuality, the one who was afflicted with the vampiric spirit. Vlad was nothing more than a meanass sonofabitch and nowhere near being a vampire.
Unfortulately for Count Volmer, he took many of the vampire legends to heart and it led to his downfall when he figured since he could both fly and turn himself into a mist he was pretty much invulnerable. This proved untrue when he hurled himself out of a fifth story window in his castle and plunged headlong into a cart full of wooden stakes being carried to a nearby town by a peasant named Bob.
The stake through the heart myth, whether it's true or not, proved fatal to Count Volmer. In fact, he had so many stakes through so many parts of himself it's hard to decide where a stake should go now.
LeahDear: wins the coveted could anyone's screenname and avatar send more different signals award for
The origin of the term voluminous. Volmer was the name of the largest lady ever recorded. Mrs Volmer fell prey to the worlds first known feeder who succeeded in fattening her up to a whopping 98 stone before concerned relatives broke down the wall of her Victorian, 2 up 2 down terrace. It is said that her body took up the entire first floor. Unfortunately poor Mrs Volmer died from the shock of seeing daylight for the first time in 20 years.

RIP
Gertrude Volmer
1856 - 1895
brynn: wins the night sweats award for
volmer - the professional volleyball athlete's version of "the actor's nightmare" in which the dreamer is continuously setting up and spiking balls in a volleyball tournament but the balls keep hitting an invisible wall just above the net which deflects them.
dddrum: wins the as it happens, Zatoichi used to see Gene Shallit walking to work pretty often when he lived in NYC award for
Volmer - A sonic filtering device named acronymically for its effect, giving the user the Voice Of Leonard Maltin. Useful at film festivals, and for driving off party guests who overstay their welcome. Enthusiastically endorsed by both the DEA (which employs it to flush out South American drug lords) and Adam Sandler (who has added stars to many of his film ratings, simply by using the Volmer and his cell phone). And if you order now, we'll throw in the amazing Shalit Shooter absolutely FREE!!

xfox: wins the entirely plausible awardfor
volmer the swilling electric energy created when French women do the Can-Can.
MadMack: wins the if it were French it would be pronounced vol-may award for
Volmer (vol-mére)

A French term popularized in poorer sections of Marsailles, referring to the impoverished street children who earn a living diving in the harbour to recover goods 'lost' overboard in the process of offloading.
Derived from the term to describe the cheap labour used to unload goods 'voldébarq'

The dirty 8 year old volmer in the corner was the one that found the box of knockoff Rolex's near pier 16.
trisherina: wins the I really should have declared a winner before there were twenty-eight entries award for
Volmer: Little-known brother of the more popular Volcan, both action figure robots made of mini cereal boxes, orange construction paper, bits of drinking straw and Scotch tape, with markered-on features.
12"razormix: wins the I don't get it, or, WTF? award for
typo in a "batman forever" review
japanese edition of cinefex online, 1995

zatoichi:
wins the I really do like my own stuff awardfor

v
olmer -- livid, enraged, out of control.

"Some newbie got confused and Jack went all volmer on his ass."
dinzdale: wins the let him who knows how to spell the friggin word cast the first stone award for
vomer n.

A popular game or pastime that has disintegrated into a pile of arse.
MasterJedi: volmer- n. a piece of gibberish, there is no true definition, its random nonsense made up by Zatoichi,

zatoichi: also takes the No, really, I like my stuff. I'm funny award for
volmer v. to abuse the capricious powers of the wordling game host.

I hate it when Zatoichi wins. He just volmers around for days.
and yet, delaying the results and letting it all pile up eventually provokes a genuine belly laugh and official new winner for


coffee:

volmer: engl. volume ~ fr. merde
A deluge of posts, pms, heartstring yanks, and blackmail attempts directed towards an unhurried dictionary game judge entreating completion of the latest word challenge with a descision and passing of the torch.

pick one of mine and I'll burn the negatives Zatoichi

Take it away, javaperson...

Coffee 06-04-2006 12:49 AM

Thank you Zatoichi. You did the right thing.
The negatives will be burned as promised, however I might publish the prints on-line should this happen again.

hmmmm....tough choice. I am torn between two words from one of my personal favorite poems.

As I am allowed only one, borogoves it shall be.

The new word is borogoves. I always wanted to know what borogoves were. Now we shall find out.

dddrum 06-04-2006 02:53 AM

borogoves- tall, reed-like plants that grow in dank, marshy areas of the enchanted forest. The plants' woody stems grow to a height of seven to nine feet, with broad, leathery leaves all around their two inch diameter. These leaves, which grow densely in all directions, are long ovoids with serrated edges. Thick copses of young borogoves make quite an effective light barrier, adding a great deal to the shadowy gloom of this part of the forest. As the plant matures, the broad leaves become thinner and more brittle, acquiring a weird, lacy appearance, and casting eerie, claw-like shadows in the half-light. This process is called "mimsing", after the legendary Princess Mims of the swamp faeries. If you were tiptoeing along through an enchanted wood, and you unexpectantly brushed against an especially mimsy borogove, its feathery appendages tracing tiny ticklish trails across your sweaty gooseflesh... well, let's just say that the shrill girlish screams that shattered the ethereal peace of the still, deep forest... would no doubt be your own.

Marcus Bales 06-04-2006 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dddrum
borogoves- tall, reed-like plants ...

A popular, but false etymology. My good friend and respected colleague is, in this instance again, quite simply wrong. The bora plant that he has been, unfortunately but expectedly, fooled by does thrive with a leaf growth pattern as odd as he is, but a borogove is not a plant, and never has been. The justly famous bora groves around the edges of the Dismal Swamp have brushed their lacy leaves against trembling gooseflesh for aeons, but that has nothing to do with the word borogove.

1. poro = 'pig' cognate with Lat. 'porcine', Greek 'rumsfeld', etc. It
has nothing to do with
2. bore = 'unending' > 'syllable' > 'letter'. It is an early name of
the sacred syllable OM. It has nothing to do with
3. ora = 'eye', cognate with Lat. 'oculis', Greek 'ossa', German
'Auge', Eng. 'eye'.

The 'etymology' he has cited has a long history, going back to the Vedic texts themselves, but in these texts the 'etymology' is better understood as word-play. Etymologies are different from word-play insofar as there is a serious effort to get right the actual historical development of the words [Greek 'etymos' = true, actual, real]. Word-play feels no obligation to etymos.

What undercuts the word-play as etymology in many Indic languages (not just the Bengali with which Mr Drum is most familiar) with a word like poro, pig, is that when you look at its cognates in other languages you have to come to the conclusion that the Sanskrit word has evolved into its shape 'pora' from earlier forms. In Old Iranian languages it took the shape 'arpa' [in Avestan] and 'ara' in Old Persian. Given the European forms that I mentioned earlier, it is clear that the underlying Proto-Indo-European form for 'pig' was something like ekros. In order to follow the train of thought that this conclusion entails, you'd have to take a couple of courses in comparative linguistics and then Indo-European linguistics. In any case, it is a demonstrable linguistic fact that the Sanskrit word for pig has nothing to do with the words for 'plant' or 'leaf' -- except in the imagination of poets.

I do not disparage the imagination of poets, of course, but they are notoriously given to taking liberties incommensurate with an historical science such as etymology, which is not impeccable, but it is rule-governed. Those who want to talk about etymology should study it, because it works the same way in all languages.

A borogove (pronounced bore oh guhv, to rhyme with 'tove' or 'love') is a pig, a wild boar; a gove (Gr. guv, L. gov, 'father without coffee') is a particularly ugly mood, so a borogove is, of course a pig with a nasty disposition.

Mimsy, though derives from more contemporary usage, and involves an accidental interface between one's morning hard tackle and the heating element or flame while cooking bacon in the nude. Consequently, a mimsy borogrove is a peculiarly loud and angry one.

xfox 06-04-2006 06:56 PM

borogoves black holes of the 21st century. Such is Human Perversity remarked Carroll. Defines east and west in one breath. Boojums! Beware of the little bopper, speaking of snarky peeps! You ask, "Is this a definition?" Yes, kitty, dear, it is.

dddrum 06-04-2006 07:15 PM

Quote:

Mark S. Pales (by comparison) sez: A popular, but false etymology. My good friend and respected colleague is, in this instance again, quite simply wrong. The bora plant that he has been, unfortunately but expectedly, fooled by does thrive with a leaf growth pattern as odd as he is, but a borogove is not a plant, and never has been. The justly famous bora groves around the edges of the Dismal Swamp have brushed their lacy leaves against trembling gooseflesh for aeons, but that has nothing to do with the word borogove.

1. poro = 'pig' cognate with Lat. 'porcine', Greek 'rumsfeld', etc. It
has nothing to do with
2. bore = 'unending' > 'syllable' > 'letter'. It is an early name of
the sacred syllable OM. It has nothing to do with
3. ora = 'eye', cognate with Lat. 'oculis', Greek 'ossa', German
'Auge', Eng. 'eye'.

The 'etymology' he has cited has a long history, going back to the Vedic texts themselves, but in these texts the 'etymology' is better understood as word-play. Etymologies are different from word-play insofar as there is a serious effort to get right the actual historical development of the words [Greek 'etymos' = true, actual, real]. Word-play feels no obligation to etymos.

What undercuts the word-play as etymology in many Indic languages (not just the Bengali with which Mr Drum is most familiar) with a word like poro, pig, is that when you look at its cognates in other languages you have to come to the conclusion that the Sanskrit word has evolved into its shape 'pora' from earlier forms. In Old Iranian languages it took the shape 'arpa' [in Avestan] and 'ara' in Old Persian. Given the European forms that I mentioned earlier, it is clear that the underlying Proto-Indo-European form for 'pig' was something like ekros. In order to follow the train of thought that this conclusion entails, you'd have to take a couple of courses in comparative linguistics and then Indo-European linguistics. In any case, it is a demonstrable linguistic fact that the Sanskrit word for pig has nothing to do with the words for 'plant' or 'leaf' -- except in the imagination of poets.

I do not disparage the imagination of poets, of course, but they are notoriously given to taking liberties incommensurate with an historical science such as etymology, which is not impeccable, but it is rule-governed. Those who want to talk about etymology should study it, because it works the same way in all languages.

I know you eye, but what am R?

dinzdale 06-05-2006 03:14 PM

borogoves n.

Borogoves are stout wooden trousers used by hutlers in the mid to late 16th century. The precise duties of a hutler and the practice of hutlery are now lost to us, but several pairs of borogoves may be seen at various stately homes in Wiltshire, England.

LeahDear 06-05-2006 05:20 PM

borogoves

A device used for removing ingrown toenails.

Rick was finding it increasingly difficult to walk as he'd lost his pair of borogoves and the chemist didn't have any more in 'til next week.

Brynn 06-05-2006 10:32 PM

borogoves - a favorite delicacy of grunions that are said to have astounding aphrodisiacal qualities - but to grunions exclusively, in the same way that catnip drives cats wild. Borogoves, inedible to humans, are commonly used by grunion gatherers as the most effective bait to entice grunions ashore to copulate before dying. Contrary to the vagaries of memory in popular imagination, borogoves bear no similarity whatsoever to slithy toves, and they are easily distinguished by their lack of gyrating, gimbling movements once they hit the "wabe", or roilingly sandy portion of the beach that the water breaks upon.

12"razormix 06-06-2006 07:40 AM

borogoves

ants on a stick
( from entertaining with insects
by ronald l. taylor & barbara j. carter )

Madmack 06-06-2006 11:45 AM

borogoves n
A derogatory slang term used to describe crooked municipal polititions.
From the English terms borough and governor

It's typical for those bloody borogoves to raise our taxes and then give themselves a salary increase.

trisherina 06-06-2006 12:17 PM

borogoves: Slights or worries manufactured by the neurotic in good times, designed to sustain the belief that life is difficult and full of pain. Can be distinguished from ordinary whines and complaints by the use of mimsy -- wherein the fantastical elements found in whimsy are used to paint the world darkly. Immortalized by Carroll Lewis in the oft-memorized satirical poem Jibberjabber.

Oh, what a tangled web we weave
When first we practice to deceive;
Less tangled, though, than what we wove
With mimsy -- our first borogove.


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