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Old 11-23-2007, 02:47 AM   #61
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so many stories
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Old 11-23-2007, 03:50 AM   #62
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Bosch and Breughal are neighbours in my brainspace,

and I heard John Clarke reading this the other week

Musee des Beaux Arts


About suffering they were never wrong,
The Old Masters: how well they understood
Its human position; how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;
How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting
For the miraculous birth, there always must be
Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:
They never forgot
That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course
Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer's horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.
In Breughel's Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster; the plowman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water; and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
Had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.


~ W. H. Auden

so here it is...

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Old 03-13-2008, 12:29 AM   #63
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This is by Brenda Bowen.
I usually think of red as connoting joy or violence...it's interesting to see it convey a peaceful sadness so effectively.

"Sorrow"
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Old 05-13-2008, 02:01 PM   #64
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Robert Rauschenberg died yesterday.



I happened to meet him when I was barely a teenager, and it opened my eyes a little bit.
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Old 05-15-2008, 07:26 PM   #65
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Did you know who he was at the time??? What happened? What do you know now about him that you didn't before meeting him?
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Old 05-15-2008, 08:15 PM   #66
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I did know who he was a bit; my dad loves art and brought me to a small gallery showing of his, and he turned out to be there, very kindly talked to us for quite a while. At the time, all I knew of his work was what he was showing -- some collages done with photographs he'd recently taken in China.

I liked art then, but I didn't understand his place in the art world, what his influences were or whom he influenced, didn't yet realize the mark he'd left on the 60's, or the mark the 60's had left on my parents and thus me. I didn't know he had been Jasper John's lover. I didn't know he once erased a drawing by de Kooning and then put it on show. I often wished I had been older when I'd met him, but then, if I hadn't met him when I was young, I might never have figured out that I'd like to talk to such people when I was older.

Mainly what I took away from the experience was that though he had very humble beginnings in a small town much like the one where I was growing up, he'd lived in Paris and New York and been to China and met John Lennon, and he thought of his own things and put them in to practice, like he had all the right in the world.
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Old 06-26-2008, 01:42 AM   #67
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I lurve pen and ink stuff, reminds me of watching my dad when I was little



this one in particular reminds me of my dad's stuff, sorry 'bout the watermark


hunter s. thompson, by ralph steadman


The file for this one is much too large, so here's the website, and here's the piece, which I promise you is worth looking at..amazing detail, so zoom on in. Anthony
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Old 07-01-2008, 12:09 AM   #68
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I just saw the Louise Bourgeois exhibit yesterday at the Guggenheim.

I am so taken with her giant bronze spiders. My first impression was to the usual cliche' of spiders - they seemed threatening, almost sci-fi - so I was surprised to learn that they are inspired by her mother, who - like a spider - was patient, with nerves of steel, an industrious weaver, artistic. So it made me look at them again and see them in a different light - fragile, delicate, careful, opportunistic/crafty
Here are some of them not included in the exhibit:













Maman 1999

I also loved all of her amazing unisex phallus/vagina sculptures -

Some of them so spent and contented and existing in perfect unity and harmony, said the audio guide, but I also see the tension between thesimple male parts complacently hemming in/protecting a torn-up female interior that seems obviously complicated and in pain :
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Old 12-01-2008, 08:41 PM   #69
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Last edited by Brynn : 12-01-2008 at 09:41 PM. Reason: This bread is acting wonky :-(
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Old 12-01-2008, 09:53 PM   #70
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^^Chinese pyrotechnic/artist Cai Guo-Qiang

thread won't let me post more than two image a post, but here's a cool article about him:

NYTimes on Cai Guo-Qiang

Most people first encountered him during the Bejing Summer Olympics - yup, he designed the fireworks.
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Old 12-12-2008, 06:49 AM   #71
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Monet Refuses the Operation

Doctor, you say that there are no halos
around the streetlights in Paris
and what I see is an aberration
caused by old age, an affliction.
I tell you it has taken me all my life
to arrive at the vision of gas lamps as angels,
to soften and blur and finally banish
the edges you regret I don't see,
to learn that the line I called the horizon
does not exist and sky and water,
so long apart, are the same state of being.
Fifty-four years before I could see
Rouen cathedral is built
of parallel shafts of sun,
and now you want to restore
my youthful errors: fixed
notions of top and bottom,
the illusion of three-dimensional space,
wisteria separate
from the bridge it covers.
What can I say to convince you
the Houses of Parliament dissolve
night after night to become
the fluid dream of the Thames?
I will not return to a universe
of objects that don't know each other,
as if islands were not the lost children
of one great continent. The world
is flux, and light becomes what it touches,
becomes water, lilies on water,
above and below water,
becomes lilac and mauve and yellow
and white and cerulean lamps,
small fists passing sunlight
so quickly to one another
that it would take long, streaming hair
inside my brush to catch it.
To paint the speed of light!
Our weighted shapes, these verticals,
burn to mix with air
and changes our bones, skin, clothes
to gases. Doctor,
if only you could see
how heaven pulls earth into its arms
and how infinitely the heart expands
to claim this world, blue vapor without end.

Lisel Mueller


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Old 12-13-2008, 05:00 AM   #72
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^ that poem (and the moon!) were the highlight of my day : )
thank you brightpearl !!
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Old 01-15-2009, 02:30 PM   #73
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Old 01-23-2009, 11:41 PM   #74
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Brynn,

I hope it is fitting for me to post on this subject from the other point of view. From the point of being an artist.

I am so happy to find this thread. Reading the words that you wrote with such sensitivity is wonderful. It is a very confirming experience to know others "hear" what is broadcast.

I am an artist. I paint in oils and acrylics. I am also a digital artist. Art is something I experience as a passionate warmth that wells up inside me when I work on something. The work unfolds as I dialogue with myself. The artistic dialogue inside me transcends language. It is more of a direct connection to creativity that circumvents typical expressions. My artistic drive or motivation is to take something you can understand and make you love it.

Some of my favorite little things to paint are abstract mushrooms. You know what a mushroom is. But if I can make you love them in a new way, I am connecting with you. Art is all about connecting. With yourself and with an audience. It is also about getting that vision out. The process is very rewarding.

Here is a little section from one of my illustrations.
In real life the background is much lighter.



I discovered my artistic talent when I was about twenty. I met a graphic artist. I watched him work. And one day I picked up his tools and drew a picture of sea shells. Everyone wanted the picture. And I then I painted a box that won a blue ribbon at the fair.

And what occured to me is that I had limited myself too much. All my life I had imagined artists to be magic. And I wasn't magic. So I could never be an artist. But then I gave myself permission to try. That was all I needed. Permission.

I have been working with my little projects for thirty years.

I think we all have an inner artist. It comes out in various ways. Not always as recognizable art, as with sports and such.

When I see how some of the people on this board write, I know that is art. I know they think about what they want to say and make it so. That is what an artist does. I see that their unique writing is also innate. So much natural talent here on the boards. It floors me at times.

Anyhow, thank you and everyone else for this thread. It's a great conversation.

PC
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Old 01-25-2009, 05:12 AM   #75
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How wonderful that you posted that, PC - thank you so much! It's very whimsical and personal. Where can I see more?


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Well, in honor of Obama's inauguration and the fact that next month is Black History Month, in the art literacy classes we're teaching the grade school students this month we'll be focusing on Romare Bearden (1911-1988)- an artist I'd never heard of before, but I've fallen in love...apparently, I live in a cave, because he's very famous :-)



This style of collage is one I just grew up with, never realizing that Bearden pioneered the photomontage method. A big part of the classes we teach involves getting the kids to emulate the artist we're covering, and so we ourselves need to do the project first so we can then help the kids with it. I have to say, this has been one of the more difficult ones for me. You would think it would be fairly simple, cutting stuff out, but I quickly found out that it's deceptively so.
He was a master of the rhythms of line and color in his compositions - I love how his work just seems to burst with exhuberent life. His subjects are not so much about things that are timeless - they are, and many are tributes to earlier Renaissance painters - but I'm struck by how each painting seems so immediate and yet frozen in tiny, unique units of time, as if he's captured a mood or feeling that would otherwise have disappeared forever.


Return of the Prodigal Son (1967)
Mariann Smith writes: "The collage contains references to both the traditional and modern versions of the story. The returning son, on the left, is greeted by two women, reflecting perhaps a common type of contemporary nuclear family. The candle between the two women might refer to the proverbial candle in the window, left burning for returning friends and family members. On the right are utensils and a salt shaker, and on the left a bottle of wine, perhaps reflecting the feast that would be served to celebrate the youth’s homecoming.

Bearden’s work is strongly influenced by the musical forms of jazz and the blues. The rhythms and tones of jazz are reflected in the way he arranges shapes and patterns and applies color to his collages. The fact that jazz is often made up of improvisation combined with a general underlying plan parallels Bearden’s working technique. Part of the message contained in The Prodigal Son was inspired by the blues, from which he adopted values such as hope and the existence of dignity in all subjects, even the most downtrodden. He said, "Even though you go through these terrible experiences, you come out feeling good. That’s what the blues say, and that’s what I believe—life will prevail." -— Mariann Smith

The Blues


The Block (1971)
"In 1969, Bearden published an article in which he wrote of "painting the life of my people as I know it—as passionately and dispassionately as Brueghel painted the life of the Flemish people of his day." Expansive in scale, narrative detail, and conception, The Block celebrates a Harlem neighborhood in a dynamic, affirmative spirit. The collage is organized in six panels that together measure eighteen feet. Dense incident drawn from an almost journalistic reporting of everyday activity is coupled with imagery from an inner world of fantasy and pure imagination. The reportorial and the fantastic are conjoined here in a scene emblematic of the African-American experience—at epic scale." (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Let's Walk The Block is a wonderful site for kids and adults alike. You have got to take a look at this. It takes a close look at this monumental work (18 ft. long), "The Block," with a great jazz soundtrack. The "look and Listen" section is particularly fun, and lets you zoom in on various parts of the painting, which contain whole worlds of their own.


A typical subject for him - jazz musicians, whom he grew up with at the height of the Harlem Renaissance:

Jazz: (Chicago) Grand Terrace–1930s, 1964, photomontage, 35 x 47 in.


^ I look at this and am transported back to some of my own dearest earliest memories of living as a tiny girl in Georgia, sometimes the only white face in the room, staring at the otherness of the faces around me and feeling safe. I really love this one.

Bearden was also an activist and a composer and a writer. Besides his photomontage work, he was an accomplished painter:

Autumn Pond




Here's a short but excellent article that sheds some light on the connection between the upheaval in 20th century African-American culture and how Bearden's work reflects that in the fragmented beauty of his work.
From Chaos to Collage: The Influence of Romare Bearden's Art on August Wilson
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