ZEFRANK.COM - message board  

Go Back   ZEFRANK.COM - message board > FAST CHAT
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 39 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 07-10-2009, 03:18 AM   #1576
trisherina
meretricious dilettante
 
trisherina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,068
Make her stop STARING at me! I am not a sheep!
__________________
Because how we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. -- Annie Dillard
trisherina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2010, 05:26 AM   #1577
MoJoRiSin
unbelievable
 
MoJoRiSin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,664
a message for people on and not on this bored : )

Girls (and everyone)
the link was corrupted somehow
here is the place I hope to visit someday
(holiday?)

http://www.castelldemporda.com/eng/index.aspx
__________________
From stone tablets to html code, it's not lost on me.
MoJoRiSin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2010, 02:38 PM   #1578
YsaPur EsChomuw
oi
 
YsaPur EsChomuw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 5,208
YsaPur EsChomuw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2010, 04:19 PM   #1579
MoJoRiSin
unbelievable
 
MoJoRiSin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,664
__________________
From stone tablets to html code, it's not lost on me.
MoJoRiSin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2010, 02:49 PM   #1580
MoJoRiSin
unbelievable
 
MoJoRiSin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,664
Grace notes from a homeless choir (Chorale de l'Accueil Bonneau).

Ads by GoogleRoues et Roulettes
Producteur de roues et de roulettes pour la manutention
www.tentecasters.ca
Cours par correspondance
Enseignement par correspondance, scolarité partielle ou complète.
www.Cours-Legendre.fr
Natural Hot Flash Relief
Try Amberen For 30 Days, & Pay Only If You Like The Results. Order Now!
www.AmberenOnline.com

Link to this page
Every once in a while, I experience a grace note in my life -- something I have the wisdom to recognize at the time as extraordinary and powerful and full of delight. That's what happened on a cold afternoon in February when I listened to the Chorale de l'Accueil Bonneau from Montreal. Some of you know this is the homeless men's choir from the Bonneau shelter in Old Montreal


. And you'll remember the accident in June 1998 when a gas explosion blew up the shelter, killing three people -- including a nun -- and injuring 17 others. The people of Montreal came together to rebuild the shelter; and, when it opened again last fall, the choir was there to celebrate.

Ads by GoogleTurn Your PC Into A Phone
Unlimited Domestic & International Calls For Free. Sign Up Here Quick!
www.MediaRingTalk.com
Double Your Money
By Trading penny Stocks Join Today for Free to Profit
www.stockpicktrading.com

Let me tell you a little about how the choir got started. Pierre Anthian is a young Frenchman, a dental technician

by profession but also a conservatory-trained singer, who had volunteered in a shelter in Paris. When he immigrated to Montreal nearly three years ago, he started volunteering at the Accueil Bonneau. Soon afterward, he decided to found a choir. It began with four men; within months there were 18. They'd go from one metro stop to another, putting out a hat to collect spare change from passers-by. Soon they were making a living for themselves. In November 1998, Anthian took the choir to Paris, where homeless clochards, sleeping in doorways and in the metro, have been fixtures for generations. Few people pay any attention to them. The French, however, paid attention to this unusual little choir. They fell in love with them.

When I discovered the choir was coming to Toronto to sing a couple of songs in a televised gala for Raising the Roof, a national charity dedicated to finding solutions for Canada's homeless, I invited them to put on a concert at my church, St. Andrew's, where we run one of Toronto's Out of the Cold programs. We invited our own homeless guests as well as staff and volunteers from all the city's hostels, shelters and other Out of the Cold programs. We made sure street people throughout the city knew they'd be welcome. We invited the city's francophone community, and they turned up in droves, led by Louis Duclos

, director of the Office of Quebec in Toronto. Some generous sponsors came forward to help. VIA Rail paid for return fares to Toronto. The Crowne Plaza Hotel donated rooms ("They treated us like kings," marvelled one of the men, "and all the rooms had 25-inch televisions!"). Lombard Insurance and the Toronto Star covered the other expenses.

Still, we were a bit nervous. We'd never done anything like this before at St. Andrew's, a bastion of Scottish tradition. For an hour before their concert, the men paced back and forth in our church hall, humming melodies, rehearsing solos and chatting with our volunteers. We discovered they were as nervous as we were, even more so when they realized there was an audience of 500 waiting for them. But two minutes after they began singing -- accompanied by a keyboard player, a drummer, a guitarist and a trombone player -- we were hooked.

Three minutes
later, they had us dancing in the aisles. Sister Susan Moran, one of the founders of Out of the Cold, was bopping at the front of the church with our own staid Presbyterians. Anthian's gift for comedy, for choreography and for lovingly managing his singers -- some of whom are still very fragile -- is a marvel to behold. They gave us the music of Edith Piaf

and Charles Trenet, they gave us the Mamas and the Papas and the Beach Boys. Their soloists, Alberto and Daniel and Guy and Jean-Louis, disarmed us with their talent and energy. We clapped along and cheered and laughed and, at the end when they sang "Auld Lang Syne



," we wept.

If you have the chance to bring this inspiring choir to your community, I urge you to do so. You will never regret it -- or forget it. Let us know if you want more information (elmstreet@m-v-p.com) and we'll send it to you.

This piece first appeared as the "Editor's Letter" in the April 1999 edition of Elm Street. Stevie Cameron is an elder at St. Andrew's King Street, Toronto, and a member of the Presbyterian Record Committee.
__________________
From stone tablets to html code, it's not lost on me.
MoJoRiSin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2010, 04:11 PM   #1581
YsaPur EsChomuw
oi
 
YsaPur EsChomuw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 5,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJoRiSin View Post
blah blah blah...
," we wept.
...blah blah blah
as do I.
YsaPur EsChomuw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2010, 04:54 AM   #1582
MoJoRiSin
unbelievable
 
MoJoRiSin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,664
Secretary Bird

http://genea.smugmug.com/popular/19/...98513341_JdGx4


(all rights reserved)
Gene Anderson
__________________
From stone tablets to html code, it's not lost on me.
MoJoRiSin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2010, 03:20 AM   #1583
MoJoRiSin
unbelievable
 
MoJoRiSin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,664
a visual for *five*

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofYrt9ymTRo
__________________
From stone tablets to html code, it's not lost on me.
MoJoRiSin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2010, 01:21 PM   #1584
trisherina
meretricious dilettante
 
trisherina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,068
That was really weird, I understood what Mo was talking about. ^^
__________________
Because how we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. -- Annie Dillard
trisherina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2010, 04:47 PM   #1585
MoJoRiSin
unbelievable
 
MoJoRiSin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,664
^ Trish, I get that : )
__________________
From stone tablets to html code, it's not lost on me.
MoJoRiSin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2010, 08:41 AM   #1586
Odbe
hope dope
 
Odbe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: down to earth
Posts: 1,908
A magician was driving down the road, and he turned into a driveway.
Odbe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2010, 11:16 AM   #1587
Hyakujo's Fox
left hanging
 
Hyakujo's Fox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: between the click of the light and the start of the dream
Posts: 10,071
we are in the world mostly unintentionally
Hyakujo's Fox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2010, 01:53 PM   #1588
MoJoRiSin
unbelievable
 
MoJoRiSin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,664
Context
H erman Melville was born in New York City in 1819, the third of eight children born to Maria Gansevoort Melville and Allan Melville, a prosperous importer of foreign goods. When the family business failed at the end of the 1820s, the Melvilles relocated to Albany in an attempt to revive their fortunes. A string of further bad luck and overwork, however, drove his father to an early grave, and the young Melville was forced to start working in a bank at the age of thirteen.

After a few more years of formal education, Melville left school at eighteen to become an elementary school teacher. This career was abruptly cut short and followed by a brief tenure as a newspaper reporter. Running out of alternatives on land, Melville made his first sea voyage at nineteen, as a merchant sailor on a ship bound for Liverpool, England. He returned to America the next summer to seek his fortune in the West. After settling briefly in Illinois, he went back east in the face of continuing financial difficulties.
Finally, driven to desperation at twenty-one, Melville committed to a whaling voyage of indefinite destination and scale on board a ship called the Acushnet. This journey took him around the continent of South America, across the Pacific Ocean, and to the South Seas, where he abandoned ship with a fellow sailor in the summer of 1842, eighteen months after setting out from New York. The two men found themselves in the Marquesas Islands, where they accidentally wandered into the company of a tribe of cannibals. Lamed with a bad leg, Melville became separated from his companion and spent a month alone in the company of the natives. This experience later formed the core of his first novel, Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life, published in 1846. An indeterminate mixture of fact and fiction, Melville’s fanciful travel narrative remained the most popular and successful of his works during his lifetime.
Life among these natives and other exotic experiences abroad provided Melville with endless literary conceits. Armed with the voluminous knowledge obtained from constant reading while at sea, Melville wrote a series of novels detailing his adventures and his philosophy of life. Typee was followed by Omoo (1847) and Mardi and a Voyage Thither (1849), two more novels about his Polynesian experiences. Redburn, also published in 1849, is a fictionalized account of Melville’s first voyage to Liverpool. His next novel, White-Jacket; or The World in a Man-of-War, published in 1850, is a generalized and allegorical account of life at sea aboard a warship.
Through the lens of literary history, these first five novels are all seen as an apprenticeship to what is today considered Melville’s masterpiece, Moby-Dick; or The Whale, which first appeared in 1851. A story of monomania aboard a whaling ship, Moby-Dick is a tremendously ambitious novel that functions at once as a documentary of life at sea and a vast philosophical allegory of life in general. No sacred subject is spared in this bleak and scathing critique of the known world, as Melville satirizes by turns religious traditions, moral values, and the literary and political figures of the day.
Melville was influenced in the writing of Moby-Dick by the work of Nathaniel Hawthorne, author of The Scarlet Letter, whom he met in 1850 and to whom he dedicated Moby-Dick. Melville had long admired Hawthorne’s psychological depth and gothic grimness and associated Hawthorne with a new, distinctively American literature. Though the works of Shakespeare and Milton and stories in the Bible (especially the Old Testament) influenced Moby-Dick, Melville didn’t look exclusively to celebrated cultural models. He drew on sources from popular culture as well; whaling narratives, for example, were popular in the nineteenth century. Melville relied on Thomas Beale’s encyclopedic Natural History of the Sperm Whale and the narrative Etchings of a Whaling Cruise, by J. Ross Browne.

By the 1850s, whaling was a dying industry. Whales had been hunted into near extinction, and substitutes for whale oil had been found. Despite its range of cultural references and affiliation with popular genres, Moby-Dick was a failure. Its reception led Melville to defy his critics by writing in an increasingly experimental style and eventually forsaking novels in favor of poetry. He died in 1891.
Moby-Dick remained largely ignored until the 1920s, when it was rediscovered and promoted by literary historians interested in constructing an American literary tradition. To these critics, Moby-Dick was both a seminal work elaborating on classic American themes, such as religion, fate, and economic expansion, and a radically experimental anachronism that anticipated Modernism in its outsized scope and pastiche of forms. It stands alongside James Joyce’s Ulysses and Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy as a novel that appears bizarre to the point of being unreadable but proves to be infinitely open to interpretation and discovery.
"context" copy and pasted from sparknotes 度tこm
__________________
From stone tablets to html code, it's not lost on me.
MoJoRiSin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2010, 01:00 AM   #1589
MoJoRiSin
unbelievable
 
MoJoRiSin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,664
The msg. made her think of this song (see below) and that made me chuckle quite some bit


Went to the fortune teller
To have my fortune read
I didn't know what to tell her
I had a dizzy feeling in my head

Siad she'd take a look at my palm
She said "Son, you feel kinda warm"
And she looked into her crystal ball
Said "You're in love"

Said it could not be so
Not with all the girls I know
She said when the next one arrives
Looking into her eyes

I left there in a hurry
Looking forward to my big surprise
The next day I discovered
That the fortune teller told me a lie

I hurried back down to that woman
As mad as I could be
I told her I didn't see nobody
Why'd she make a fool out of me

Then something struck me
As if it came from up above
While looking at the fortune teller
I fell in love

Now I'm a happy fellow
Well I'm married to the fortune teller
We're happy as we can be
Now I get my fortune told for free

Now I'm a happy fellow
Well I'm married to the fortune teller
We're happy as we can be
And I get my fortune told for free
~The Rolling Stones
Fortune Teller
__________________
From stone tablets to html code, it's not lost on me.
MoJoRiSin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2010, 07:03 AM   #1590
Brynn
constantly amazed
 
Brynn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: in the labyrinth of shared happiness
Posts: 6,206
It's all so astonishing, every bit of it.
__________________
1. While sitting at your desk, lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise circles.
2. Now, while doing this, draw the number "6" in the air with your right hand.
3. Your foot will change direction.
Brynn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 08:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.