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Old 06-29-2007, 07:32 PM   #76
brightpearl
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I would save this for Monday, but there's no way I'll remember. My kiddo enjoyed this demo of a virtual frog dissection. Thought someone might feel like taking a walk down high school memory lane.
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Old 06-29-2007, 09:51 PM   #77
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i much prefer that to the actual practice of hacking up animals.
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Old 06-30-2007, 12:07 AM   #78
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That was pretty cool, and nowhere near as disturbing as our dissections were.

The teacher decided to give us a more "thorough" dissection, and ended up scraping away at the frog's skull to show us the brain and optic nerve. Bleh.

I'm meant to do fetal pigs this year.
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Old 07-02-2007, 09:10 PM   #79
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^I spent 6 weeks on the same dead cat when I was a senior. Looked like my pet cat of course. Ugh.
--------------------------------------

Barnacles have 2 larval stages. The nauplius just floats around. After a couple of weeks, it turns into a cyprid, which can swim and finds a nice area in which to settle. Then, it cements its head to the substrate and metamorphoses. It stays like that for the rest of its life, legs up in the air for filter feeding.

Though hermaphroditic, barnacles have the longest penis proportional to body length of any known critter.
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Old 07-02-2007, 10:56 PM   #80
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There are more than 50 types of helminthic infection that people can get from fish. The two most common types are anisakiasis (infection by one of many types of roundworm/nematode) and fish tapeworm. Roundworm infection usually comes from eating marine species, while tapeworm generally comes from fish that spend all or part of their time in fresh water. Sushi made from fish that has not been previously frozen is of the most concern - thoroughly cooking the fish kills all parasites, as does commercial freezing. Freezing in a home freezer may take a week or so to be effective, because it isn't as cold. Most resistant to freezing is a parasite that is emerging as a problem for humans -- the North American liver fluke (don't look), which is found in fresh water fish and infects the bile duct and/or gallbladder.



There are all sorts of interesting (and nasty) little creatures that live on fishes yet do not cause infection in humans. They latch on to scales, gills, eyeballs, you name it. The most bizarre one in my opinion is Cymothoa exigua,the "tongue-eating louse." It literally eats and replaces the tongue of the fish, feeding both on the fish and what the fish eats. It's related to the common pill bug/roly poly, but it is supremely icky. If you're terribly curious and have a strong stomach, well...you still probably don't want to see this photo.
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Old 07-03-2007, 09:31 AM   #81
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^ very interesting read, thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by brightpearl View Post
Though hermaphroditic, barnacles have the longest penis proportional to body length of any known critter.
this immediately evoked Matt Groening's "School is Hell" - one of my favorite children's books:

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Old 07-03-2007, 09:36 AM   #82
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Old 07-03-2007, 09:50 AM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T.I.P. View Post
this immediately evoked Matt Groening's "School is Hell" - one of my favorite children's books:
That is precisely the kind of association I was trying to evoke.


I was this kind of kid, but I always got away with it.
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Old 07-04-2007, 11:13 PM   #84
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"Mah N Mah N" is a well-known pop music song, written by Piero Umiliani. It was a hit in many countries, including the USA, in 19681969. "Mah N Mah N" debuted as part of Umiliani's soundtrack for the Italian softcore pornography movie Svezia, Inferno e Paradiso (1968), a pseudo-documentary film about wild sexual activity and other behavior in Sweden ("Mah N Mah N" accompanied a scene set in a sauna).

The song became familiar to many from its renditions by the Muppets on national television. On November 30, 1969, "Mahna Mahna" was performed on the The Ed Sullivan Show by a Muppet also known as Mahna Mahna, and the Snowths. Also in 1969, "Mahna Mahna" was performed on Sesame Street by a character that was later known as Bip Bipadotta, along with two Anything Muppet girls.
Many thanks to DoonDoon for getting this damn thing stuck in my head!
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Old 07-05-2007, 02:13 AM   #85
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Now that's the kind of stuff that makes your day, every time.
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Old 07-09-2007, 09:25 PM   #86
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I've been reading.

The London Underground has its own species of mosquito. It's evolved rather faster than one might have expected, just a century or so.

I knew about the carnivorous Lewis' moon snail

..but it turns out that there is such a thing as a carnivorous sponge. It captures crustaceans on its velcro-like spicules and digests them over a few days.

Funny, it doesn't look vicious.

Speaking of vicious, despite the marvel of modern technology aspect, am I the only one who is nervous about this?

It's looking at me, Ray.
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Old 07-09-2007, 09:49 PM   #87
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you're in a johnny cab!
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Old 07-09-2007, 10:42 PM   #88
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hi auntie aubrey
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Old 07-09-2007, 10:53 PM   #89
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hello, my sweet.
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Old 07-15-2007, 01:23 AM   #90
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?
Question mark

Origin: When early scholars wrote in Latin, they would place the word questio - meaning "question" - at the end of a sentence to indicate a query. To conserve valuable space, writing it was soon shortened to qo, which caused another problem - readers might mistake it for the ending of a word. So they squashed the letters into a symbol: a lowercased q on top of an o. Over time the o shrank to a dot and the q to a squiggle, giving us our current question mark.

!
Exclamation point

Origin: Like the question mark, the exclamation point was invented by stacking letters. The mark comes from the Latin word io, meaning "exclamation of joy." Written vertically, with the i above the o, it forms the exclamation point we use today.


=
Equal sign

Origin: Invented by English mathematician Robert Recorde in 1557, with this rationale: "I will settle as I doe often in woorke use, a paire of paralleles, or Gmowe [i.e., twin] lines of one length, thus : , bicause noe 2 thynges, can be more equalle." His equal signs were about five times as long as the current ones, and it took more than a century for his sign to be accepted over its rival: a strange curly symbol invented by Descartes.

&
Ampersand

Origin: This symbol is stylized et, Latin for "and." Although it was invented by the Roman scribe Marcus Tullius Tiro in the first century B.C., it didnt get its strange name until centuries later. In the early 1800s, schoolchildren learned this symbol as the 27th letter of the alphabet: X, Y, Z, &. But the symbol had no name. So, they ended their ABCs with "and, per se, and" meaning "&, which means and." This phrase was slurred into one garbled word that eventually caught on with everyone: ampersand.

#
Octothorp

Origin: The odd name for this ancient sign for numbering derives from thorpe, the Old Norse word for a village or farm that is often seen in British placenames. The symbol was originally used in mapmaking, representing a village surrounded by eight fields, so it was named the octothorp.

$
Dollar Sign

Origin: When the U.S. government begin issuing its own money in 1794, it used the common world currency - the peso - also called the Spanish dollar. The first American silver dollars were identical to Spanish pesos in weight and value, so they took the same written abbreviations: Ps. That evolved into a P with an s written right on top of it, and when people began to omit the circular part of the p, the sign simply became an S with a vertical line through it.


Olympic Rings

Origin: Designed in 1913 by Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the five rings represent the five regions of the world that participated in the Olympics: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania. While the individual rings do not symbolize any single continent, the five colors - red, blue, green, yellow, and black - were chosen because at least one of them is found on the flag of every nation. The plain white background is symbolic of peace.


"The Symbol"

Origin: Okay, so were running out of symbols, but this is a great pop culture story: In 1993, Princes dissatisfaction with his record label, Warner Bros., finally reached its peak. Despite his superstar status and $100 million contract, the Purple One didnt feel he had enough creative control over his music. So "in protest," Prince announced that Prince would never perform for Warner Bros. again - this unpronounceable symbol would instead.

The symbol for the Artist Formerly Known as Prince combined three ancient symbols: the male symbol, the female symbol, and the alchemy symbol for soapstone, which was supposed to reflect his artistic genius. Prince retired the symbol when his contract with Warner Bros. ran out in 2000. Today, he is again Prince.
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