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Old 01-30-2012, 01:29 AM   #1696
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..".... Following Steven Collins, we can take a particularly vivid example from one of the Jataka stories (stories of the Buddha's previous lives, one of the most widely known genres of the Buddhist canon) , a story that is long and fascinating which I will all too briefly summarize. (*)
"Once upon a time there was a king of Beneres who ruled justly (dhammena). He had sixteen thousand woman, but did not obtain a son or a daughter from any of them." Indra the king of the gods, took pity on him and sent the future Buddha to be born as a son to his chief queen. The child was named Temiya, and his father was delighted with him. When he was a month old he was dressed up and brought to his father, who was so pleased with him that he held him in his lap as he held court. Just then four criminals were brought in, and the king sentenced one of them to be imprisoned, two to be lashed or struck with swords, and one to be impaled on a stake. Temiya was extremely upset and worried that his father would go to hell for his horrible deeds. The next day Temiya remembered his previous births, including that in the past he had been king of th is very city, and that, as a result of his actions he had subsequently spent 80,000 years in an especially terrible hell, where he had been cooked on hot metal in excruciating pain the whole time. He determined that this would not happen again, so he pretended to be lame deaf, and dumb, so that he could not succeed to the kingship.

Because he was beautiful and had a perfectly formed body, people found it had to believe in his defects, but because he was a future Buddha, he was able to resist all temptations to give himself away whether with loud noises, terrifying snakes, or beautiful girls. When he was 16b the soothsayers told the king that he would bring bad luck to the royal house and should be killed. His mother begged him to save himself by showing that he was without defect, but knowing what his fate would be if he succeeded to the kingship, he refused. Temiya was sent in his chariot to the charnel ground, where he was to be killed, but the gods saw to it thath the charioteer took him to the forest instead....
(to be con't)
~story retold by
Robert N. Bellah
Religion in Human Evolution
page 584

* this is the well know "Birth Story of the Dumb Cripple" (Mugapakkha Jataka, Ja.6.1ff ., no. 538)
For a complete translation see "The Story of Temiya the Dumb Cripple" in The
Jatakas: Birth Stories of the Bodhisatta
, trans. Sarah Shaw (New Delhi Penguin, 2006), pg 179-221
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Old 01-31-2012, 02:13 AM   #1697
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Old 02-18-2012, 01:08 AM   #1698
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continued from ^^
.............(I left some out here)
.....they (his followers) left gold and jewels in the streets of the city as of no more use. Soon a neighboring king hearing what had happened decided to annex Benares and scoop up the gold and jewels.....



...more to come
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Old 02-23-2012, 03:21 PM   #1699
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I used to be a lot more funny a few years ago
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Old 02-23-2012, 03:21 PM   #1700
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Old 02-25-2012, 09:02 PM   #1701
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Old 02-26-2012, 12:36 PM   #1702
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^watch that instead
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


This is an interesting film that one should think not as a documentary about a Jordanian collecting trash but more an explanation of a culture westerners have trouble understanding. I suspect this film may be a doc spiced with some.... hmmm shall we say nondoc story telling. We are told early in the film due to an economy chronically gasping for air, Middle Eastern impoverished men often relocate to Europe or the States for employment or else become Islamic extremists and if resettling in the land of Infidels for jobs they are not good Muslims. Hard choices. Early in Abu Amars life he left Jordan to fight with the Mujahadeen in Afghanistan(a good Muslim) though the film starts off much later in the Jordanian city of Zarqa(home of modern day folkhero-Musab al-Zarqawi) where Abu is eking out a living driving around in a failing truck with his kids rounding up cardboard. Despite needing to borrow rent for his slum apartment he has a working TV, cell phone, eight kids and seems to always have food on the table(same in Americas slums.) This along with an UNfilmed foray by Abu into war torn Baghdad allegedly towing cars for sale/delivery made me wonder Recycles veracity. Abu struggles day to day while grousing his financial problems are the result of his estranged father though does not elaborate meanwhile is working on a book which he lacks the funds to publish. There are friends of Abus, couch philosphers who appear repeatedly discussing/explaining Islamic and Middle East culture/politics. Amusing they understood why Afghanistan was invaded after 911 but the reason to invade Iraq escapes them, me too. No cultural divide there. At the end Abu faces the decision of leaving his country for economic opportunity. The ending though poignant also makes me wonder(?real.) Regardless, well done and culturaly enlightening.
movie review found at netflix dot com
Recycle

Recycle
2007NR76 minutes
In a rundown Jordanian city, ex-mujahedeen Abu Amar struggles to provide for his family while also trying to accomplish his goal of getting his book published. But no matter how hard he tries, he can't seem to escape suffering daily humiliations. This documentary, which takes place in Zarqa, the hometown of the late Islamic militant Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, follows Abu Amar's experiences as he tries to build a normal life.

Cast:Abu Amar Director:Mahmoud al Massad Genresocumentaries, Foreign Movies, Foreign Documentaries, Dutch Movies, Middle Eastern Movies, Arabic-Language MoviesLanguage: Arabic This movie is:GrittyAvailability:Streaming

for sure
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Old 03-14-2012, 12:15 AM   #1703
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German Emigration Records

Many German emigrants exited through the ports of Bremerhaven and Cuxhaven. Bremerhaven was the port of Bremen because the Bremen port was full of silt and needed dredging. Ships could not get into Bremen. Cuxhaven was the port for Hamburg. Other German ports were primarily located along the eastern sea board and included Stettin, Gdansk (Danzig), Libau, Memel, and Riga. Germans also used Scandinavian ports (especially Copenhagen). The ports in Antwerp, Belgium and le Havre, France were also used.
Some causes for German emigration:

Compulsory military conscription was unpopular. Many young men emigrated without permission in order to avoid military service. It has been estimated that more than fifty percent of young men of military age emigrated illegally.
In the early 1800s, an economic depression and over-population caused restrictions on marriages and attempts to limit growth in poor areas of the south and central Germany. Young couples in these areas often emigrated separately or together, often with illegitimate children.
Only three religions were allowed in German lands: Catholic, Lutheran and Reformed. Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm III united the Reformed (Calvinist) and Lutheran churches in 1817 on the 300th anniversary of the Reformation. These religious restrictions caused some to emigrate for religious convictions.
Industrialization in the mid 1800s created many new jobs, but also caused the decline of the cottage industries which had kept many families from starving. The hardest hit were the linen weavers who worked on looms in their homes. Mechanical looms and the competition from foreign markets drove many to pack up and leave.
Rising grain prices in the early 1830s, mid 1840s, and 1850s created a hardship on sustaining a family.
Some communities tried to get rid of the chronically underprivileged members of the society, with some towns paying the passage cots in exchange for the individual giving up all citizenship rights and promising not to return.
Improved transportation with the removal of tolls on the Rhine, Main and Neckar rivers in the 1830s, made it cheaper to travel to a port city. The railroad miles also doubled by 1846-47.
Industrialization wiped out home industries such as spinning, weaving, etc.
Land prices were increasing, but the income produced from the land did not have the corresponding increase. Selling the land rights often provided enough money to allow a family to emigrate.
Some farm sizes had become so small that they no longer could support a family.
From 1830-1845, growing grapes for the wine industry was unstable, and a series of bad crops caused many to emigrate.
The largest share of taxes and military personnel came from tradesmen, farmers, artisans, and laborers. Many did not want their children to feel the brunt of upcoming wars, unemployment, indebtedness, and impoverishment.
Relatives or friends who had already emigrated sent positive reports back to their hometown. Their reports encouraged others to follow.
Some political refugees, especially after the failed 1848 revolution, decided to leave.

Some destination sites for the emigrants:

Many from the crowded south of the German areas in the 1700s moved to new Prussian lands opening in Pomerania, West and East Prussia, Silesia, and Posen.
Hungary, Spain, Russia, and France were other destinations which developed German-speaking pockets.
Following the Thirty Years' War in 1648, the Swiss moved in to rebuild destroyed regions, but this did not always work out as planned.
In the 1700s, it is estimated that 830,000 Germans emigrated to Russia, while only 125,000 went to America. Catherine the Great invited German farmers to emigrate to her unsettled frontier in the southern Ukraine along the Black Sea and the Sea of Azor. About 37,000 accepted the 1763 invitation.
From 1717-1775, most of the Germans going to America landed in Philadelphia and gave Pennsylvania the largest German population.
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Old 03-20-2012, 11:48 PM   #1704
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could you even imagine one of your friends inviting you to a baby shower for her fifth child when you had already attended the (ones for the) other four?
(fyi: I certainly can not)
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Old 03-24-2012, 06:17 PM   #1705
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Baal Shem Tov, 1698 - 1760
Master of the Good Name


Israel Ben Eliezer, later known as The Baal Shem Tov (The Master of the Divine Name, var. Master of the Good Name), was born on August 27, 1698 to Rabbi Eliezer and his wife Sarah. They lived in the small village Okup on the Russian-Polish border. Both Rabbi Eliezer and Sarah were already very old when their first child, Israel was born.

Baal Shem means "Possessor or Master of The (Divine) Name", which contemporaries and subsequent followers conferred upon him. Martin Buber explained more kindly: 'One who lives with and for this fellow-men on the foundation of his relationship with the Divine'.

^http://www.saieditor.com/stars/baal.html

what doe "Baal" mean?
i wonder
i always thought it meant "false god"
why did i think that?


~~~

Vhttp://www.aish.com/jl/h/cc/48954961.html

The Hassidic movement ― the movement of the "pious ones" or Chassidut, in Hebrew ― was founded in the 18th century in Eastern Europe by Rabbi Israel ben Eliezer, who became known as the Ba'al Shem Tov, which means "Master of the Good Name."
He was born in 1698 in Okup, in Podolia province (of what is now Ukraine) near the Dniester River. The Ba'al Shem Tov (who was also known as the Besht) was a poor orphan child who worked in the Carpathian Mountains as a laborer. During this time he studied with a secret society of Jewish mystics, the Nestarim, and he eventually became a revered rabbi.
He traveled from community to community, developing a reputation wherever he went as a spiritual holy man and mystical healer, attracting a huge following.
His teachings revolutionized the demoralized, persecuted Jews of Eastern Europe.
After the pogroms and massacres, large parts of Eastern European Jewry had slipped into dire poverty. In addition to the tremendous physical destruction wrought by the Chmielnicki massacres, the tremendous disappointment caused by the false Messiah Shabbetai Tzvi left much of the Jewish population of Eastern Europe in a collective state of deep depression. One of the victims of this situation was Jewish scholarship, with only an elite few studying in yeshivas while the rest eked out a meager living. As a result of the decrease in scholarship, Jewish religious life suffered ― with the average Jew not connecting either intellectually or spiritually with God. And this is what the Ba'al Shem Tov sought to change.
His teachings (he left no writings) brought about a whole movement which emphasized the idea of bringing God into all aspects of one's life, particularly through intense prayer and joyous singing. He taught that even the deeds of the simplest Jew, if performed correctly and sincerely, were equal to those of the greatest scholars.

Hassidic thought stressed the importance of devekut or "clinging to God." This involves feeling the presence of God in all aspects of one's existence and not just through Torah study and observance of the commandments.
The following parable describes the way the early Hassidic masters diagnosed the situation:
An apprentice blacksmith, after he had learned his trade from the master, made a list for himself of how he must go about his craft. How he should pump the bellows, secure the anvil, and wield the hammer. He omitted nothing. When he went to work at the king's palace, however, he discovered to his dismay that he could not perform his duties, and was dismissed. He had forgotten to note one thing-perhaps because it was so obvious-that first he must ignite a spark to kindle the fire. He had to return to the master, who reminded him of the first principle which he had forgotten.(1)
Trying to infuse one's life with spirituality in all aspects caught on very rapidly among the simple Jews in particular. Very rapidly, especially in Eastern Europe, thousands upon thousands of Jews were drawn to the Hassidic movement.
Hassidic Dynasties
When the Ba'al Shem Tov died in 1760, he was succeeded by Rabbi Dov Ber or Mezrich whose disciples went off to develop particular streams within the Hassidic movement and to found their own dynasties. There were many significant personalities in this group. (For those interested in reading about them, see Chassidic Masters: History, Biography and Thought by Aryeh Kaplan.) We will mention just a few:
Rabbi Dov Ber (1704-1772). Known as the Maggid of Mezritch, he succeeded the Ba'al Shem Tov as head of the Hassidic movement and further developed many of the movement's philosophies. Incidentally, the great psychologist Carl G. Jung, nearing his death, said that all of his advances in psychology were preempted by Rabbi Dov Ber, which gives you an idea of the Maggid's insights into human nature. (See C.G. Jung Speaking, p. 271-272.)


Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, (1745-1812). He was known as the Alter Rebbe and the Ba'al HaTanya. He wrote the famous work, the Tanya, and founded the Lubavitch sect of Hassidism. The Lubavitch Hassidim are known as Chabad ― which is an acronym for chochmah, ("wisdom"), binah ("understanding") and da'at ("knowledge.") According to Kabbalah, these are the three highestintellectual of the ten sefirot ― channels of Divine energy ― and their name for this Hassidic sect hints how much its teachings are steeped in Kabbalah.



"Hassidism uplifted the masses, but it would be wrong to suppose that its teachings were designed solely as a kind of spiritual medicine, necessary when one is ill, but of no value for the healthy. An important teaching of Hassidism is that its insights are important to the spiritual well-being of every Jew. Although its masters aimed much of their energies at helping poor, illiterate Jews, it would be incorrect to say that this was the main characteristic of Hassidism, since the movement also brought new vision and depth to the entire body of Jewish thought."
The Opposition
As it spread, the Hassidic movement also attracted tremendous opposition from those more traditionally and intellectually-minded Rabbis, the majority of whom were against the Hassidic movement.
The major personality who was opposed to the Hassidic movement was Rabbi Elijah ben Shlomo Zalman, known as the Vilna Gaon ("Genius of Vilna") and also the Gra (acronym for the "Gaon Rabbi Elijah") who lived in this time period (1720-1797). The Vilna Gaon was a brilliant scholar who made an enormous impact on Jewish learning. A person of wide-ranging interests and author of some 70 books on various subjects, the Vilna Gaon seemed to excel in every aspect of scholarship. He knew Jewish law, Kabbalah, mathematics, astronomy, physics, anatomy. He barely slept; he just catnapped four times a day for one hour, and the rest of the time he studied. Whenever he got tired, he stuck his feet in a bucket of cold water to wake himself up. He never wanted to waste a minute. Although he never made it to Israel, he sent many of his students to live there.
What worried the Vilna Gaon was not so much the Kabbalistic aspects of Hassidism (after all, he himself had studied Kabbalah) but the potential for producing another false messiah (like Shabbetai Tzvi whose story we covered in Part 51. The Vilna Gaon also objected to the Hassidic concept that God is "in all things" as too close to pantheism or the idea that everything was equally holy.(2)
He was also concerned about the concept of the rebbe (as the leader of each Hassidic sect was called) because he felt that the Hassidic concept that a person elevates himself spiritually simply by "attaching" himself to a holy person (a rebbe) was an idolatrous idea.
Another significant concern of the Vilna Gaon was de-intellectualization of Torah. The Hassidic movement was largely a movement of simple, uneducated Jews, and he worried that Jewish scholarship was going to be replaced by singing and dancing. A religion that was a synthesis of heart and mind would become all heart and no mind.
Finally, the Vilna Gaon, and many other rabbis strongly objected to the fact that the Hassidim had changed the text of the prayer as this was considered a serious break with tradition and wholly unacceptable.
The Vilna Gaon was so strongly opposed to the Hassidic movement that he and others like him came to be called misnagdim, which means "those who are against." In 1772, the misnagdim excommunicated the hassidim, but the ban did not stick. The following is excerpts from the excommunication of Hassidim (April 1772):
Our brethren, sons of Israel…as you know, new people have appeared, unimagined by our forefathers….and they associate amongst themselves and their ways are different from other children of Israel in their liturgy…they behave in a crazed manner and say that their thoughts wander in all worlds…And they belittle the study of the Torah, and repeatedly claim that one should not study much, nor deeply regret ones' transgressions…Therefore, we have come to inform our brethren, Children of Israel, from near and far…and top sound to them the voice of excommunication and banishment….Until they themselves repent completely….(3)
(For more on this subject, see Triumph of Survival by Berel Wein, pp. 86-119.)
While the creation of the Hassidic movement did initially cause a serious split in the Jewish world, it did not create a permanent separation. Today we can see hassidic sects who have become quite scholarship-minded, opening their own yeshivas and studying the Talmud intensely.
In hindsight we see that the Hassidic movement contributed significantly to the revitalization of Eastern European Jewry. (i left some out here) r.
As a result of the Hassidic contribution, Judaism became stronger and more ready to face the assault from a new secular movement in the Western called "The Enlightenment."
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Old 04-02-2012, 07:33 AM   #1706
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Queen Latifa has a beautiful voice
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:22 PM   #1707
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One of these signats showed some animal heads and ears of corn, all jumbled together, and no one has ever been able to understand what it was intended to
convey
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Old 04-06-2012, 08:58 PM   #1708
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"thank you for all prayers granted"
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Old 04-11-2012, 12:24 AM   #1709
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prelude; overture; prolouge; preliminary match; foreplay; perfor-
mance; practical (exam); audition; das ist erst das ~ that is just
for starters
Collins German Unabridged Dictionary
seventh edition, 2007
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:28 PM   #1710
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