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Old 04-13-2012, 06:48 PM   #1711
MoJoRiSin
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Smile everything is random?

Row row row
Your boat
Gently
Down
The stream

(You know the test)
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Old 04-28-2012, 02:28 PM   #1712
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that really is how it appears in the original

"Readers’ comments on What Does [Sic] Mean? point up the curious feature of the human mind that infuses meaning into the meaningless.
I always thought it was an abbreviation for “Spelling Is Correct.”
I think I read on this site that someone believed “sic” to stand for “said in context”.
I had previously thought it was an acronym for “Spelled InCorrectly”.
This type of fill-in-the-blanks reasoning is at work in elaborate conspiracy theories and when someone sees the face of Jesus in a tortilla.
The tendency to find meaning in the partially-known is called apophenia: finding meaning or patterns where none exist.
Unfamiliar with the source of the notation [sic], readers make use of the letters and the context to create something that makes sense to them.
We all fall into this kind of fallacious reasoning at some time or another. Uncomfortable in a new situation, we hear laughter and are certain that the people are laughing at us. The narrative of the movie A Beautiful Mind revolves around the protagonist’s apophenic beliefs.
For those of us who write fiction, some aspect of apophenia must be at work when we spin whole narratives out of a chance remark or the glimpse of an oddly-dressed person on a train.
The human mind craves meaning. We look at our lives and see a meaningful narrative. We find evidence for beliefs that other people find preposterous.
If you browse the Wikipedia articles that stem from the one on apophenia, you’ll find several types of this kind of thinking.
One type is called Morton’s Demon, named by Glenn R. Morton to explain what was at work in his mind when he believed in a widely-held theory he no longer believes in.
Morton entered the study of physics believing firmly in creationist theory. His study of geology changed his belief. He then gave a name to the type of reasoning that had enabled him to believe in a theory with insufficient physical evidence:
Morton’s demon stands at the gateway of a person’s senses and lets in facts that agree with that person’s beliefs while deflecting those that do not."
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Old 05-12-2012, 12:59 PM   #1713
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Error messages to post

"Sorry no matches please try some different terms"
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:08 PM   #1714
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here's what mo thinks (not that you care) ....

Jesus may be a code word for heaven
(do you see it like i do?

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Old 05-23-2012, 11:09 PM   #1715
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[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 06-02-2012, 12:25 PM   #1716
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[size="3"]
i sure hope you guys are laughing now
[/SI ZE]
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Old 06-12-2012, 02:15 AM   #1717
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I saw a bobcat kitten today, a wild one playing next to a culvert in a neighborhood bordering on miles and miles of open space. I was driving up the road and startled it a bit, it scampered away for a sec away from the culvert, relaized it was running the wrong way and dashed back to hide in the culvert. It looked up at me as I slowllly drove past and Meow/Snarled at me. OMFG...cutest thing I have Ever seen.


Photograph by Hope Ryden/Nat. Geo.
It was a bit grayer color but this is closest I could find in google images.

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Old 06-12-2012, 07:21 AM   #1718
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I looked up images of 'culvert'. I had to.

^cute kitty.
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Old 06-14-2012, 10:37 AM   #1719
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Old 06-18-2012, 01:57 PM   #1720
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Malina is the Slovak word for raspberry.
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Old 06-24-2012, 09:11 PM   #1721
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why am i posting this

i have no idea....
do you?


"Pigs for small farms

Why pigs have snouts

-- "Pigs are ideal ploughs, rooting up weeds and turning over the ground, while they manure it at the same time. They need to have a house and temporary fence (eg, electric netting) to confine them to the area.

Free-range pigs (Christine Thery) As soon as it has been cleared, move the house and fence ready for the next section." -- Katie Thear, Country Smallholding Magazine

-- "Use your own pigs, or borrow a neighbour's, to dig beds for you and to manure your land. Keep them in a moveable pen. Put them where you want your beds to be made. Leave them there until they have dug and manured enough." -- People's Farming Workbook

-- "Pigs would make an excellent addition to a farm for pasture renovation. Pigs can be extremely rough on pasture. Why not use unrung pigs on poor pasture instead of a plow? Then just level and reseed. Fertility would be taken care of by rotational grazed pigs." -- Greg Gunthorp, pasture pork producer.

See: Fertility Farming by Newman Turner, Chapter 17. Pigs and Poultry on the Fertility Farm. "In the building up of fertility, especially on the poor light-land farm, there is no animal more effective than the pig."

Raising pigs on soil in Japan

-- From "Multi-pollution" by Sawako Ariyoshi (first published in serial form in Asahi Shimbun newspaper from October 1974 to June 1975), translated by Midori Hiraga

I've heard many organic farmers saying: "I'm doing organic farming without hoping to make a profit." Some complain: "The biggest dissatisfaction is that consumers always demand cheap products. They don't think of the farmers who grow their food." But I finally found one young farmer who stated clearly: "I decided on organic farming because I want to make money." He was a 27-year-old pig farmer.

"You have to raise healthy pigs to make money," he said. "You can't raise healthy pigs on the artificial feeds on the market, and vets just inject lots of medicine when the pigs get sick. I don't want to eat such a pig -- and pigs don't become healthy with the medicines either. There are thousands of anti-fungicides and antibiotics in artificial pig feed. I can't let my pigs eat such stuff! The best food for healthy pigs is healthy soil."

The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry in Japan says 65% of pigs sent to abattoirs are sick. The Department of Agriculture in the US reported that only half the piglets survive. Vets and scientists have concentrated on eradicating disease with new treatments, vaccinations, new antibiotics, but still, half the piglets die. So medicine couldn't solve the basic problem, and half the piglets die in protest.

A farmer in England reported: "If you confine pigs inside, many piglets will get diarrhoea [white scour]. I feed these sick piglets plenty of fresh soil full of humus, which contains no chemical fertilizers. I've proved that piglets stay healthy when they eat soil. You should start feeding piglets healthy soil when they're one week old, and continue until they're six weeks old. You'll be surprised how much soil piglets eat! The interesting thing is that it's no use at all feeding them chemically fertilised soil." [From "The Living Soil" by Lady Eve B. Balfour, Faber & Faber, London, 1943 -- see below.]

It seems the young farmer I met had done his homework. I had heard that soil is good for pigs, but I'd never actually seen such a pig. So I decided to visit him at his farm in the mountains.

He and his wife built their farmhouse themselves, using old wood thrown away a few years previously when it was a trend to build a new house. The couple met when he was 24, but their parents opposed the marriage, so they left their families and built their first house by themselves. An architect friend helped them with the structure, and they learnt basic construction techniques from him. Later they built pig housing on their own. His wife can even do welding.

The road to the house was untarred, red mountain soil, but there was plenty of rich black soil in the field in front of the pig pens. The farmer chased the pigs out of the house onto the field.

"It was just a mountain area full of trees and grass here," he said. "We set up electric fences around the field, but you only need to turn it on a couple of times. Pigs are smart and learn quickly, they won't try to escape after that."

Several pigs began digging in the soil with their noses. "Oh, this field was ploughed by pigs?" I asked.

"Yes. It was full of trees and grass, so first they ate grass, then they ate the grass roots and tree roots, and the trees fell down by themselves. You can see the timber over there," the farmer told me. There were piles of timber outside the fence, to be used for fuel wood.

A pig started urinating in front of me. Such a noise it made! The soil turned dark shining black with the pig's urine. Meanwhile, it was eating and digging in the soil all the time.

___"How long did it take to clear all the trees and grass?" I asked.
___"Well, less than half a year, I suppose," he said.
___"With such a small herd of pigs?"
___"The pigs do their job until they become pregnant. When they are pregnant, they stay in the house," he said.
___"How long?"
___"Three to four months."
___"How long has this place been ploughed by pigs altogether?"
___"About one and a half years. It's ploughed too much already, so I'm thinking to move to the next field," he said.

I was impressed to see the rich black soil in the field. Pigs had cleared the trees and grass, eaten it all, and quickly turned poor red mountain soil into fertile black soil rich in microorganisms, and the microorganisms then became good food for pigs. Black soil is soft and warm, it easily absorbs the warmth of the sun.

I hadn't imagined pigs' snouts could do such a job better than tractors. "It's a 'bull-ton-zer'," I said ("ton" means pig). The farmer laughed at my silly joke. He told me that costs are low farming pigs this way, and the pigs grow happily and healthily with plenty of exercise and lots of sunshine. Sows give birth to about 10 piglets twice a year.

"If you feed them soil, there are no weak or deformed piglets. Everything is so economical. Of course, you can only use the mountain soil nowadays."

Only the mountain soils are safe for pigs, most other soil is now too polluted.

Lady Eve's pigs

In "The Living Soil" (Faber & Faber, London, 1943), one of the founders of the organic growing movement, Lady Eve Balfour, tells how she kept her piglets healthy on her farm at Haughley in Suffolk, England. Pigs bred in modern housing are very prone to white scour -- prolonged diarrhoea. The text-books say it's caused by iron deficiency and recommend iron supplements, or, as an alternative, feeding the piglets pieces of turf.

"I have made many experiments in connection with the curing and prevention of this trouble. From the turf remedy I tried experiments with ordinary soil from arable fields. It was not long before I found that soil gathered from a field rich in humus, where no chemicals had been applied, was quite as effective as turf, curing the pigs within forty-eight hours. Whereas soil from exhausted land, or land treated with chemicals, had no effect in curing the disease. I also noticed that young pigs running in the open on good pasture, provided it was not too hard for them to rootle (as, for instance, in hard frost, or very prolonged drought), never suffered from this disorder. It is never a menace to my herd now under any conditions, even in long spells of severe winter weather, when the ground is covered with snow, and the pigs have to be entirely housed up. Under such conditions I no longer wait for the first sign of scour, but regularly collect the soil of fresh mole hills, newly thrown up above the snow, on land I know to be fertile. Collected daily, this soil is friable in the hardest frost, and is equally good in very wet weather, for it is never sticky. The pigs eat it voraciously in incredible quantities, starting when about a week old. I sometimes add a little chalk to it, which the pigs seem to like."

"The Living Soil" by Lady Eve B. Balfour, Faber & Faber, London, 1943
http://www.soilandhealth.org/"

^ source:
http://journeytoforever.org/farm_pig.html
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Old 06-30-2012, 08:54 PM   #1722
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When the Dalai Lama
Was a young boy
His mother was brought to see
him once a month
~~~~~
He is fairly close to perfect
Mo thinks
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:53 PM   #1723
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"Over the past 50 y, behavioral experiments have produced a large body of evidence for the existence of a magnetic sense in a wide range of animals. However, the underlying sensory physiology remains poorly understood due to the elusiveness of the magnetosensory structures. Here we present an effective method for isolating and characterizing potential magnetite-based magnetoreceptor cells. ...."

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/06/29/1205653109
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:53 PM   #1724
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oh, and tee hee for PNAS get it?
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Old 08-13-2012, 12:19 AM   #1725
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I want this to happen.
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