ZEFRANK.COM - message board  

Go Back   ZEFRANK.COM - message board > FAST CHAT
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 11-17-2007, 12:02 AM   #181
auntie aubrey
excursions
 
auntie aubrey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: beyond the call of duty
Posts: 2,443
fake fishmongers plague edinburgh

Quote:
FAKE fishmongers are continuing to operate in Edinburgh, targeting residents in Newington and Fairmilehead in the past week, according to Trading Standards.

Police are working with council officials to trace the men, who are believed to be operating without a licence.

The Evening News drew attention to the fake fish salesmen nearly two weeks ago, but they appear to have continued their charade.

The men are selling fish pre-packed in polystyrene and wrapped in cling film, which does not meet even the minimum labelling requirements. In some cases it is thought they have sold Vietnamese catfish as monkfish fillets.

In the latest reports, which both came into the council late last week, a person in Newington paid £90 for fish, while another paid almost £400 to the individuals.
$400? someone really likes monkfish.
__________________
that dog won't hunt, monsignor
auntie aubrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 06:11 PM   #182
brightpearl
Rhinoceros fan
 
brightpearl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,749
There is so much about this story that I love. I especially love the holy crap part. Ooooohhhh, it would be so neat if he were right.

This is the E8 thing they're talking about, btw.

Bigger view here.

Surfer dude stuns physicists with theory of everything
By Roger Highfield, Science Editor
An impoverished surfer has drawn up a new theory of the universe, seen by some as the Holy Grail of physics, which has received rave reviews from scientists.

In winter, he heads to the mountains near Lake Tahoe, Nevada, where he snowboards. "Being poor sucks," Lisi says. "It's hard to figure out the secrets of the universe when you're trying to figure out where you and your girlfriend are going to sleep next month."

Despite this unusual career path, his proposal is remarkable because, by the arcane standards of particle physics, it does not require highly complex mathematics.

Even better, it does not require more than one dimension of time and three of space, when some rival theories need ten or even more spatial dimensions and other bizarre concepts. And it may even be possible to test his theory, which predicts a host of new particles, perhaps even using the new Large Hadron Collider atom smasher that will go into action near Geneva next year.

Although the work of 39 year old Garrett Lisi still has a way to go to convince the establishment, let alone match the achievements of Albert Einstein, the two do have one thing in common: Einstein also began his great adventure in theoretical physics while outside the mainstream scientific establishment, working as a patent officer, though failed to achieve the Holy Grail, an overarching explanation to unite all the particles and forces of the cosmos.

Now Lisi, currently in Nevada, has come up with a proposal to do this. Lee Smolin at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, describes Lisi's work as "fabulous". "It is one of the most compelling unification models I've seen in many, many years," he says.

"Although he cultivates a bit of a surfer-guy image its clear he has put enormous effort and time into working the complexities of this structure out over several years," Prof Smolin tells The Telegraph.

"Some incredibly beautiful stuff falls out of Lisi's theory," adds David Ritz Finkelstein at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. "This must be more than coincidence and he really is touching on something profound."

The new theory reported today in New Scientist has been laid out in an online paper entitled "An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything" by Lisi, who completed his doctorate in theoretical physics in 1999 at the University of California, San Diego.

He has high hopes that his new theory could provide what he says is a "radical new explanation" for the three decade old Standard Model, which weaves together three of the four fundamental forces of nature: the electromagnetic force; the strong force, which binds quarks together in atomic nuclei; and the weak force, which controls radioactive decay.

The reason for the excitement is that Lisi's model also takes account of gravity, a force that has only successfully been included by a rival and highly fashionable idea called string theory, one that proposes particles are made up of minute strings, which is highly complex and elegant but has lacked predictions by which to do experiments to see if it works.

But some are taking a cooler view. Prof Marcus du Sautoy, of Oxford University and author of Finding Moonshine, told the Telegraph: "The proposal in this paper looks a long shot and there seem to be a lot things still to fill in."

And a colleague Eric Weinstein in America added: "Lisi seems like a hell of a guy. I'd love to meet him. But my friend Lee Smolin is betting on a very very long shot."

Lisi's inspiration lies in the most elegant and intricate shape known to mathematics, called E8 - a complex, eight-dimensional mathematical pattern with 248 points first found in 1887, but only fully understood by mathematicians this year after workings, that, if written out in tiny print, would cover an area the size of Manhattan.

E8 encapsulates the symmetries of a geometric object that is 57-dimensional and is itself is 248-dimensional. Lisi says "I think our universe is this beautiful shape."

What makes E8 so exciting is that Nature also seems to have embedded it at the heart of many bits of physics. One interpretation of why we have such a quirky list of fundamental particles is because they all result from different facets of the strange symmetries of E8.

Lisi's breakthrough came when he noticed that some of the equations describing E8's structure matched his own. "My brain exploded with the implications and the beauty of the thing," he tells New Scientist. "I thought: 'Holy crap, that's it!'"

advertisementWhat Lisi had realised was that he could find a way to place the various elementary particles and forces on E8's 248 points. What remained was 20 gaps which he filled with notional particles, for example those that some physicists predict to be associated with gravity.

Physicists have long puzzled over why elementary particles appear to belong to families, but this arises naturally from the geometry of E8, he says. So far, all the interactions predicted by the complex geometrical relationships inside E8 match with observations in the real world. "How cool is that?" he says.

The crucial test of Lisi's work will come only when he has made testable predictions. Lisi is now calculating the masses that the 20 new particles should have, in the hope that they may be spotted when the Large Hadron Collider starts up.

"The theory is very young, and still in development," he told the Telegraph. "Right now, I'd assign a low (but not tiny) likelyhood to this prediction.

"For comparison, I think the chances are higher that LHC will see some of these particles than it is that the LHC will see superparticles, extra dimensions, or micro black holes as predicted by string theory. I hope to get more (and different) predictions, with more confidence, out of this E8 Theory over the next year, before the LHC comes online."
brightpearl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 07:36 PM   #183
lukkucairi
earth worker
 
lukkucairi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: on the planet
Posts: 5,844
don't miss the animation of it ^^



I have no effing idea what they're trying to show here, but it's purty.
lukkucairi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 09:09 PM   #184
trisherina
meretricious dilettante
 
trisherina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,068
and here you were worried about the glass ceiling?

Quote:
The study, conducted in 14 Ontario hospitals and involving almost half a million patient records, found that 57 per cent of patients admitted to hospital are women, but only 40 per cent of admissions to ICU are women.

All told, severely ill women are about one-third less likely to be treated in ICU than men with comparable conditions.

Women are also less likely to undergo mechanical ventilation to help with breathing, as well as pulmonary artery catheterization, a technique for detecting life-threatening conditions such as heart failure or blood poisoning.
__________________
Because how we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. -- Annie Dillard
trisherina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 09:38 PM   #185
brightpearl
Rhinoceros fan
 
brightpearl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,749
^holy hell.
*sigh*
brightpearl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 09:41 PM   #186
Anna
n
 
Anna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,752
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukkucairi View Post
don't miss the animation of it ^^ I have no effing idea what they're trying to show here, but it's purty.
I've got walls full of these, but I can't wait to see how he accounts for the cuts;
gravity glue?

hey surfer d00d
Anna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2007, 02:00 AM   #187
trisherina
meretricious dilettante
 
trisherina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,068
no defeating metabolism today

Quote:
But there were also side effects noted with all three drugs -- in particular, rimonabant. The researchers found that drug increased the risk of mood disorders such as depression or anxiety.

Coincidentally, a study was published Friday in The Lancet that also looked at the ill effects of rimonabant. It showed that obese patients taking the drug have a 40 per cent increased risk of developing severe depression and anxiety compared to those taking a placebo.
__________________
Because how we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. -- Annie Dillard
trisherina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2007, 01:08 AM   #188
Tunesmith
click click click
 
Tunesmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: snap the fingers
Posts: 2,229
Nestle applies quantum mechanics to optimize food taste, texture, nutrition
by Lisa Zyga



Researchers from Nestle and the University of California have investigated the physics of food structure, and their results may help scientists create foods with optimal stability, nutrient delivery, flavors and aromas.
Most foods have very complex structures due to their many components. For example, a single food has a combination of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and carbohydrates that make determining food structure very challenging.

Nevertheless, a food“s structure plays an important role in defining many of the characteristics of food, such as taste and nutrition. For instance, in order to release nutrients into the body, the food structure must take on a certain complex arrangement.

In this study, which is published in Physical Review Letters, the scientists studied how water molecules interact with lipids, which are fat-soluble molecules such as fats and oils. These interactions could serve as a physical basis for understanding and defining the structure of different foods, enabling scientists to assemble the various components in an optimal organized structure.

Until now, no quantitative theoretical framework had been established to understand the structural changes that occur in lipid-water interactions under varying conditions. Now, the researchers have developed a thermodynamic model that describes the phase sequences that take place in solutions of lipids and water. To calculate these phase sequences, the scientists used a quantum mechanical theory called self-consistent field theory.

In the future, the researchers will investigate how to apply this understanding of food structure to optimize foods for different specific purposes and on an industrial scale.
(http://www.physorg.com/news114364461.html)
Tunesmith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2007, 02:16 AM   #189
trisherina
meretricious dilettante
 
trisherina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,068
big void in space

Quote:
Radio astronomers have found the biggest hole ever seen in the universe. The void, which is nearly a billion light years across, is empty of both normal matter and dark matter.
__________________
Because how we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. -- Annie Dillard
trisherina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2007, 04:27 AM   #190
Frieda
in limbo
 
Frieda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 19,503
we got goatse'd by the universe
__________________
zoek waar je wil, maar het zit in jezelf

oh yeah
Frieda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2007, 07:49 AM   #191
brightpearl
Rhinoceros fan
 
brightpearl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,749
^dirty space news...

ze should marry you.
brightpearl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2007, 07:59 AM   #192
T.I.P.
balancing actor
 
T.I.P.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: america
Posts: 2,706
Tree man who "grew roots" may be cured

Story of an Indonesian man afflicted with a skin condition that results in tree-like growths covering his body.
T.I.P. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2007, 01:42 PM   #193
lukkucairi
earth worker
 
lukkucairi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: on the planet
Posts: 5,844
^^ that's apparently where the legend of the jackalope came from - jackrabbits with runaway HPV that causes them to grow horns...
lukkucairi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2007, 02:02 PM   #194
brightpearl
Rhinoceros fan
 
brightpearl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,749
^As a native Texan I can assure you that the jackelope is a bonafide animal, totally unlike the wretched, obviously diseased specimen in your link. They roam the plains in large herds, carrying their antlers majestically, stopping at nothing in their paths, except the occasional Starbucks. They feed exclusively on jackelope berries and hibernate during the average 2 weeks of Texas winters. They've been known to save small children trapped in wells or drowning in seasonal creeks. As proof I present the following documentation, which I scanned from my high school science textbook.
brightpearl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2007, 08:21 AM   #195
Hyakujo's Fox
left hanging
 
Hyakujo's Fox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: between the click of the light and the start of the dream
Posts: 10,071
Toilet home 'may have traumatised' compost worms

Quote:
A New Zealand inventor has been forced to defend the use of worms in a composting toilet he has developed after officials became concerned that the creatures might become traumatised by the procedure.

Coll Bell was told to get an expert's report on the mental impact on the tiger worms being used after an official became concerned during a site visit.

He says the official felt that the worms were being unfairly treated, being expected to deal with human faeces, and that it could affect them in a psychological way.

Mr Bell was told he had to get someone with the necessary qualifications to say the worms were happy.

A vermiculture consultant was called in and she has found the worms are in excellent health and breeding happily.
Hyakujo's Fox is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 04:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.