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February 22, 2011

"a sequence of lines consecutively traced by five hundred individuals"

from the website :: "A Sequence of Lines Consecutively Traced by Five Hundred Individuals is an online drawing tool that lets users do just one thing - trace a line. Each new user only sees the latest line drawn, and can therefore only trace this latest imperfect copy. As the line is reproduced over and over, it changes and evolves - kinks, trembling motions and errors are exaggerated through the process. A Sequence of Lines Consecutively Traced by Five Hundred Individuals was first created as a tool to be used in conjunction with Amazon's Mechanical Turk - an online labor market. Mechanical Turk workers were payed 2 cents to trace a line." :: click below to watch ::


A Sequence of Lines Traced by Five Hundred Individuals from clement valla on Vimeo.

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Comments (5)

This reminds me of an Australian Artists work; He appropriated someone ele's art, photocopied it and continued to photocopy each new copy until eventually he was left with just a few scattered line fragments...

I'm pretty sure it was Imants Tillers.

Then there's the conversation of drawing between two artists (perhaps it was Robert Rauschenburg and Jasper Johns...). One drew something for the other. The receiver then erased the drawing, signed it and gave it back as a new work of art.

I'm not quite sure if I've attributed these works to the right artists, which in a way, reinforces their concepts. Over time, things get written over, half-forgotten and re-remembered in different ways.

Maybe I'm just excusing my own laziness instead of trying to find my uni work notes!

"Every time I learn something new, something old falls out of my brain."
-Homer Simpson

Posted by: Ginger at February 22, 2011 4:41 PM

I couldn't help but think of rivers and how the tiniest differences in their initial paths leads to greater and greater variation through time. Gosh, initial conditions, and slight variation are so interesting and so powerful.

I wonder how this applies to the understanding of say religion. For example, here are Christ's teachings version C said this, and then by the time they wrote down what he had said, it was already at version C said this through 500 voices.

Posted by: Russell Evans at February 22, 2011 9:25 PM

Wow, at first I thought, "heh, the first person made the biggest deviation..." then it was sped up and the constant jumps (large deviations) made me really confused... why would people do that? Did they not understand the task or did they deliberately do it?

Cool idea.

Posted by: Cherrie at February 23, 2011 4:58 AM

"Then there's the conversation of drawing between two artists (perhaps it was Robert Rauschenburg and Jasper Johns...). One drew something for the other. The receiver then erased the drawing, signed it and gave it back as a new work of art."

It was Rauschenberg who erased a de Kooning drawing:

http://tinyurl.com/4st94qw

Posted by: DS Bakker at February 23, 2011 11:16 PM

I wonder how long it would take to get back to the original line...

Posted by: Will at February 24, 2011 12:22 AM

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