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Frieda 12-05-2009 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YsaPur EsChomuw (Post 418167)
How did the operation go? Let us know when you can use your eyes again as they were designed to.

went well enough-- the procedure itself is a piece of cake, but the pain the next day was awful, painkillers didn't do a thing. it's a lot better now, burning but not too bad. sunglasses help. i'm wearing a bandage contact lens thingy in my eye that is going to be removed on monday.

other than that, i look like the doctor used his fists instead of a scalpel, but i am told this too will go away! i can't wait........:)

Frieda 12-05-2009 12:08 PM

oh, and it's better than the jaw surgeon.

much better.

Stephi_B 12-05-2009 02:12 PM

eye-eye wishes!!

:):):):)

I dunno why, but somehow there's never the appropriate time to contact the jaw surgeon with respect to definite action in the matter of my wisdom teeth (I have four exemplars in total, none of them ever did a thing to me, but the x-rays do forcast something.... says the surgeon, my dentist says: no hurry) - somehow the universe is against such measures :D:p

YsaPur EsChomuw 12-05-2009 02:44 PM

^^^ :)

here are some cool sunglasses ;)


brightpearl 12-05-2009 08:59 PM

Oh so very glad your eye is healing up Freida. I can't imagine having to be awake for that, eeek! But I hope it clears up the troubles you were having. Take good care.
:cool:

zero 12-07-2009 02:26 PM


Brynn 12-07-2009 04:10 PM

That movie still gives me nightmares :eek:

MoJoRiSin 12-07-2009 04:16 PM

erase her head ??
 
^^

to be hones zero, that appears to be the dumbest movie ever!
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Merriam-Webster’s
Word of the Day

December 7

Nimrod

\NIM-rahd\

noun


Meaning

1 : a descendant of Ham represented in Genesis as a mighty hunter and a king of Shinar
*2 not capitalized : hunter
3 not capitalized, slang : idiot, jerk

Example Sentence

Dad fancied himself a mighty nimrod after he captured the rabbit who had been eating our garden.


Check out Merriam-Webster's NEW word games — Word Sudoku, Deep Sea Word Search and more!


Did you know?

Nimrod is described in Genesis as "the first on earth to be a mighty man" and "a mighty hunter before the Lord." It's easy to see how people made the leap from one mighty hunter in the Bible to calling any hunter a "nimrod." A lesser-known fact is that "nimrod" has seen some use in English as a noun meaning "tyrant" (apparently, the mighty Nimrod was not reputed to be an especially benevolent king), although that sense is now essentially obsolete. The legendary Nimrod is also sometimes associated with the attempt to build the Tower of Babel. Because the tower resulted in the wrath of the Lord and proved a disastrous idea, "nimrod" is sometimes used with yet another meaning: "a stupid person."

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.

lukkucairi 12-07-2009 07:09 PM

hey, don't take it as a burden, but every once in a while I want to thank you again for catalyzing my life.

so, thanks :)

brightpearl 12-08-2009 01:17 AM

^whether you know or not, you helped me catalyze mine, so it all goes around in a big big circle thingy.
Enzymes are reusable, you know. :)

brightpearl 12-15-2009 12:50 PM

rock on

MoJoRiSin 12-15-2009 01:56 PM

Love's Labour's Lost ?
^first that came to mind
>just the title not the story<
and then thsi:
(see below)


"Distinguishing boys from girls is a typical nineteenth century characteristic in children's
literature. The late eighteenth and early nineteenth century fiction did not stress the
difference between boys and girls, but rather between good and bad behaviour. Children's
literature changed along with adult fiction, where both the images of women and children
were romanticised. Women and children were sketched as weak, self-sacrificing angels,
while men were like soldiers or knights. (Nelson 1991, 2, 6-9) The angelic image was
partly due to the twisted relations between middle-class men, women and children in the
contemporary society. The middle- and upper-class children, especially boys, who were
sent to boarding schools, very rarely had a close relationship with their parents. (Reynolds
1994, 2-3) But even the children, who lived at home, were often more attached to their
nannies than their parents. Winifred Gwyn-Jeffreys has described this paradoxical situation
in her book of memories from a late nineteenth century middle-class nursery, published in
the early 1970s:
It is strange when one comes to compare our childhood with conditions in
bringing up children today. How very little contact we had with the grown-up
world of our parents. I am sure our mother must have come up often to visit
us in the nursery, but if so, it certainly made no lasting impression on me. "Of
course we loved our parents, but that was quite automatic. As far as our daily
lives were concerned they were quite unimportant to us.
Every winter, they went to the Riviera for six weeks. We did not miss them,
but we greatly enjoyed making "Welcome Home" posters to greet them on
their return. These we plastered all over the house."
(Gwyn-Jeffreys 1970, 11- 2)
The servants, who raised the children, were often almost parental substitutes. Thus, middle-
or upper-class men had a very distant image of the women of their own social class, whose
purity and virginity were emphasised. They socialised rather with other men, because they
were accustomed to it in boarding schools, military and civil service and private clubs. ....."

...."The children, however, spent so little time with their parents that childhood was seen as a
pretty and angelic age by middle-class adults, who wrote most of the literature of the era.
Children, just like women, were described as very distant. No realistic characteristics were
combined with the angelic image, which was a typical way of representing women and
children in Victorian fiction. (Reynolds 1994, 2-3) The image of an angel may have a link
with the literary utopias, because the most drastic of them was heaven; a natural place for
an angel to live. (Nelson 1991, 2, 6-9) In this way, the road leads towards the Edenic
secondary worlds of children's fiction, substitutes for Heaven in numerous ways."
~Mirva Saukkola

http://ethesis.helsinki.fi/julkaisut...a/theedeno.pdf


btw
(these days the transverse is also true :: "the mother is a great source of neurosis for he child" Osho)

mo's owm mother (luckily for her) was far to distant to all 5 of her children to cause any lasting damage : )

Brynn 12-16-2009 07:26 PM

For Jacks :) Cat makes amazing discovery

Jack Flanders 12-16-2009 07:34 PM

hahaha!! I've seen that one before!! Not to be a big bummer, but we had to put Soupy to her final rest last week. Her kidneys were so bad. She was 18 and had a beautiful life. Now I'm left with one really retarded cat. She's only 10 yrs. old. arggg!

Brynn 12-16-2009 07:40 PM

Geez Louise! Poor Soupy. I'm so sorry :(


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