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zero 10-22-2007 11:57 AM

*question*

do you ever get deja vu?


I get deja vu of having had deja vu of having had deja vu in an infinite regression. does this happen to anyone else?

Frieda 10-22-2007 12:39 PM

yes, it happens to me too

T.I.P. 10-22-2007 12:47 PM

i've noticed i get déjà-vus at pivotal moments in my life.
These pivotal moments usually occur after moments of great activity, hence a lack of sleep, hence the déjà-vus

Just the same, i've learned to pay attention when i get a déjà-vu - it's like a signal that tells me something important is happening or about to happen.

brightpearl 10-22-2007 01:29 PM

^Yeah, I get it more often when there are intense things going on, too...
What's that about? :confused: :)

auntie aubrey 10-22-2007 05:28 PM

sure. i've only gotten the recursive sensation in recent years. the sudden sense that i've experienced the sudden sense that i've experienced this before.

craig johnston 10-22-2007 05:48 PM

i think i've read this thread before.
and a few others.

;)

Tunesmith 10-22-2007 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lukkucairi (Post 365807)
I get deja vu of having had deja vu of having had deja vu in an infinite regression. does this happen to anyone else?

Totally, and it's completely paralyzing. Everything feels so...in place and predictable for that moment that it seems wrong to break the spell.

Sorry for the hijacking, but...



I can't resist. :D

lukkucairi 10-22-2007 08:59 PM

^^ oh, but it's a good one :D

I got deja vu actually this afternoon, again - the infinite regression kind.

is there such a thing as suggestible deja vu?

and will TIP forgive us for not using the correct accents over the e and a?

:p

brightpearl 10-22-2007 09:24 PM

^yes, as long as we all remember to hold our forks correctly.
:D

auntie aubrey 10-22-2007 09:39 PM

neither here nor there:

Quote:

Déjà vécu

Usually translated as 'already lived,' déjà vécu is described in a quotation from Charles Dickens:
“We have all some experience of a feeling, that comes over us occasionally, of what we are saying and doing having been said and done before, in a remote time – of our having been surrounded, dim ages ago, by the same faces, objects, and circumstances – of our knowing perfectly what will be said next, as if we suddenly remember it!”

When most people speak of déjà vu, they are actually experiencing déjà vécu. Surveys have revealed that as much as 70% of the population have had these experiences, usually between ages 15 to 25, when the mind is still subjectable to noticing the change in environment. The experience is usually related to a very ordinary event, but it is so striking that it is remembered for several years afterwards.

Déjà vécu refers to an experience involving more than just sight, which is why labeling such "déjà vu" is usually inaccurate. The sense involves a great amount of detail, sensing that everything is just as it was before and a weird knowledge of what is going to be said or happen next.

Hyakujo's Fox 10-22-2007 09:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lukkucairi (Post 365807)
*question*

do you ever get deja vu?


I get deja vu of having had deja vu of having had deja vu in an infinite regression. does this happen to anyone else?

it's freaky when you get that meta deja vu for the first time. now I don't think I ever get deja vu without the deja vuity getting wrapped up in its own deja vuness. that convinces me that deja vu is not actually the feeling that something has happened before, but for some reason feels like the feeling that something has happened before.

T.I.P. 10-23-2007 05:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brightpearl (Post 365695)
question for Sunday, Oct. 21:

Are you aware of your sense of smell in your dreams?

for those of you interested in catching up on the state of the art in dream science, there are a number of interesting articles in today's online NYT science section

http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science...html?th&emc=th

zero 10-23-2007 06:04 AM

:mad: oi! excusez moi monsieur! mais ecoutez - bollocks to dream science, i'm noticing some folk just cannie seem to stop themselves from blahblahblahing on about ¿ questions of the day ? long after the question's had it's day

Quote:

Originally Posted by me
* no answering or discussing this question after today. at midnight somebody must pose a new ¿ question of the day ?



thank you for your kind assistance in these matters and post a new ¿ question of the day ? while you're at it

T.I.P. 10-23-2007 06:32 AM

you're absolutely right it's intolerable all this blahblahblahing around here after the day is done.

I have just the question to set things straight:

¿ Is there a sequence of events (3 or more) that you repeat every day in exactly the same order, in which each gesture has been repeated so many times that it is now reduced to a minimalist expression of perfection ?

zero 10-23-2007 06:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terry
¿ Is there a sequence of events (3 or more) that you repeat every day in exactly the same order, in which each gesture has been repeated so many times that it is now reduced to a minimalist expression of perfection ?


could you repeat the ¿ question of the day ? please?

T.I.P. 10-23-2007 06:53 AM

i would be happy to oblige but the RULES of this thread oblige me to refrain any déjà "vous"

brightpearl 10-23-2007 07:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by T.I.P. (Post 365868)
you're absolutely right it's intolerable all this blahblahblahing around here after the day is done.

I have just the question to set things straight:

¿ Is there a sequence of events (3 or more) that you repeat every day in exactly the same order, in which each gesture has been repeated so many times that it is now reduced to a minimalist expression of perfection ?


yes
*clams up*

zero 10-23-2007 07:14 AM

.
Quote:

Originally Posted by terry
¿ Is there a sequence of events (3 or more) that you repeat every day in exactly the same order, in which each gesture has been repeated so many times that it is now reduced to a minimalist expression of perfection ?
Quote:

Originally Posted by terry
déjà "vous"
Quote:

Originally Posted by terry
¿ Is there a sequence of events (3 or more) that you repeat every day in exactly the same order, in which each gesture has been repeated so many times that it is now reduced to a minimalist expression of perfection ?
Quote:

Originally Posted by terry
déjà "vous"
Quote:

Originally Posted by terry
¿ Is there a sequence of events (3 or more) that you repeat every day in exactly the same order, in which each gesture has been repeated so many times that it is now reduced to a minimalist expression of perfection ?
Quote:

Originally Posted by terry
déjà "vous"






no

madasacutsnake 10-23-2007 07:16 AM

No. But almost every workday I ask other people to perform a sequence of three actions. Then I give them a score according to how well they perform.

Stephi_B 10-23-2007 07:17 AM

Zroe you wanna drive Teri-cheri crazy? ;) (no official question, no official question, no, no, no!)

Quote:

Originally Posted by T.I.P.
¿ Is there a sequence of events (3 or more) that you repeat every day in exactly the same order, in which each gesture has been repeated so many times that it is now reduced to a minimalist expression of perfection ?

There is a sequence: crawling out of bed (i.e. mattress) - turning on radio - making coffee - searching ciggies/ashtray/lighter - sitting cross-legged in my green armchair (but turned by 90° so I have the ashtray on the armrest in front of me) - having the ritual c&c with music.
Unfortunately the minimalist, perfect flow is too often disturbed by morning-clumsiness-induced spilling of coffee on the way from the kitchen... though if I include that into the sequence... then: yes :)

brightpearl 10-23-2007 07:19 AM

^oh yes
the coffee-spilling is the wabi-sabi that qualifies it as perfection!

T.I.P. 10-23-2007 07:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stephi_B (Post 365876)
[size="1"]
There is a sequence: crawling out of bed (i.e. mattress) - turning on radio - making coffee - searching ciggies/ashtray/lighter - sitting cross-legged in my green armchair (but turned by 90° so I have the ashtray on the armrest in front of me) - having the ritual c&c with music.
Unfortunately the minimalist, perfect flow is too often disturbed by morning-clumsiness-induced spilling of coffee on the way from the kitchen... though if I include that into the sequence... then: yes :)

"turned by 90° so I have the ashtray on the armrest in front of me" is exactly the perfection i was talking about ;)

Stephi_B 10-23-2007 07:48 AM

^ & ^^ Mille grazie :) ;)

trisherina 10-23-2007 09:50 AM

Timing the making of oatmeal and coffee such that they are ready and beep at the EXACT same time that the dog wants back in.

T.I.P. 10-23-2007 10:34 AM

open front door, remove coat and walk three steps, press the computer ON button with, rotate 170° and three steps back to fill a pot with water/turning on the electric stove, go to wash hands in lavatory, come back to type administrative password that is appearing on a prompt screen that has appeared on computer at that exact moment, walk back to refrigerator, remove vegetables,..etc..

[continue this kind of sequence until sleep]

zero 10-23-2007 12:27 PM

^day in the life of a bot

T.I.P. 10-23-2007 12:59 PM

^ had to settle for arsebook because the turing tests were too difficult on myspace

zero 10-23-2007 01:04 PM

you nexus, huh? i design your arse...

T.I.P. 10-23-2007 01:06 PM


Stephi_B 10-24-2007 08:40 AM

New ¿question of the day? for 10/24/07

¿Are you right, left or both handed? Does any other body part of you behave sort of 'asymmetric'?



Me: right hander, though limited abilities with left hand (inserting & turning a key goes quite well for example), when I'm standing for a longer time, I tend to shift my weight on the right leg and the left fidgets about, otherwise no noticeable asymmetry

eta: shift on the left leg... just tested that... can't keep apart left and right at times... :o

zero 10-24-2007 09:32 AM

right-handed with left-eyed ness

trisherina 10-24-2007 09:42 AM

I sweep with a curling broom (not the modern brush they call a broom, a curling broom) left-handed. All other activities prefer to use my right side.

T.I.P. 10-24-2007 10:00 AM

i am right handed

Someone made me realize that even chewing is polarized (try it, you' ll find you prefer chewing more on one side more than on the other). i prefer the right hand teeth.

lukkucairi 10-24-2007 11:15 AM

naturally right-handed with ambidextrous tendencies.

incipient carpal-tunnel syndrome in right wrist has led to the development of ambimousetrousness and ambitrackpadness. i also use a tablet.

I chew on the left. use both sides pretty equally timewise, but for different things. right side has better fine motor control. left side has better stability.

auntie aubrey 10-24-2007 01:01 PM

i'm solidly left-handed. i chew on the left-side, too.

the only activity i can manage with my right hand is using a computer mouse. in fact it's this single instance of asymmetry that results in a total inability to use a tablet. let me see if i can explain...

when i'm using a mouse i have to use my right hand. which means the activity interface is hand-on-mouse-eyes-on-screen. when i'm writing i have to use my left hand which means the activity interface is hand-on-pen-eyes-on-contact-point-with-surface.

a tablet, however, means holding a pen and looking at the screen. i get an absurdly intense confusion between brain and motion when i try to hold a pen and look at a screen. i end up juggling the pen between hands and then eventually abandoning the effort altogether. this means i do even advanced and intricate photoshopping with mouse or touchpad. tablet collects dust.

auntie aubrey 10-24-2007 01:04 PM

oh yes, i just remembered another anomaly. i've never been able to draw or write with my right hand, even in a basic way. but if i'm talking to someone and i gesture to indicate the action of drawing or writing, i tend to mime the activity with my right hand.

the only way i've been able to explain it is that i'm surrounded by righties 99% of the time (although the spouse is also left-handed). so when i see someone write, and therefore create the association of activity with concept, i see it with a right hand. so when i use a gesture in a "universal language" sort of way to signify that activity, i default to my right hand.

otherwise everything is on the left.

Angry Kid Hoyt 10-24-2007 01:10 PM

I'm Right-handed.
But I grew up in a left-handed home.
I still have a problem using "normal" scissors

Stephi_B 10-24-2007 01:16 PM

^Hello Angry Kid Hoyt :)


Quote:

Originally Posted by TeriCheri
Someone made me realize that even chewing is polarized (try it, you' ll find you prefer chewing more on one side more than on the other). i prefer the right hand teeth.

Yes, true, tried it on an apple: left side.

Angry Kid Hoyt 10-24-2007 01:21 PM

Howdy, Stephi_B :D

brightpearl 10-24-2007 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by auntie aubrey (Post 366030)
oh yes, i just remembered another anomaly. i've never been able to draw or write with my right hand, even in a basic way. but if i'm talking to someone and i gesture to indicate the action of drawing or writing, i tend to mime the activity with my right hand.

That is fascinating. I love brains.

I am a rightie in everything but politics.


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