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Old 02-18-2005, 02:59 AM   #16
shmitty
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Absolutely not. I hate the packaging. Not quite as much as DVD's packaging, but it's extremely annoying to me none the less. As for the covers, they take up too much room and I can find all the information that would be inside online.
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Old 02-18-2005, 04:11 AM   #17
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Metallica - pfft. They have decided to release a new CD with a few that have "golden tickets" in them. If you get one, you can go meet the band. I will be downloading this album. Fvcking Willy Wonka they are not.


Lars is such a loser.

Oh and yes, I still buy cds. I don't' store any music on my pc and never will. I do like being able to browse in a store for my music. Different people, different preferences.
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Old 02-18-2005, 11:14 AM   #18
craig johnston
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'i was in the music business, yeah,
i roadied for metallica, buncha assholes!'

sorry, don't have the exact quote
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Old 02-20-2005, 02:00 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smartypants
I like a physical CD with its liner notes, photos, track info, etc.
I second that. I view my CDs as a collection, and I like to have the real things, have it for posterity. I like to think that someday my kids will pore over my by-then archaic CD collection like I used to do to my parent's extensive LP collection.
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Old 02-20-2005, 06:57 AM   #20
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I think the best albums make you feel like you've been on a journey somewhere, in a way a compilation of various artist singles can't seem to manage. I guess it's something to do with the songs all being variations on a theme or at least on a 'sound'.

Then again there are those albums with two (or one and a half) singles followed by eight b-sides...
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Old 02-20-2005, 12:49 PM   #21
craig johnston
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^^^^^
ideally, yes. but tbh i can't think of many albums
without at least one duff track.
my favourite album of all time is 'what's going on'
by marvin gaye, and even that has one bad track.
but yeah, sitting down to listen to an album is a
completely different experience to setting the ipod
to shuffle.
interesting subject this actually, cos it raises all
kinds of issues about our relationship to art in these
changing times.
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Old 02-20-2005, 03:31 PM   #22
trisherina
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craig, you know I love you dearly, but the next time you are tempted to use the wink icon, picture my teeth nearing your fingertips.

(I'm a wolverine.)
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Old 02-20-2005, 10:32 PM   #23
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It seems like, for a reasonably large album to be downloaded in a reasonable amount of time, there would have to be some kind of compromise in quality-- isn’t MP3 lossy? (yes) Sometimes album remakes are sold at 20-bit resolution so you can hear more nuances to the sound that weren’t available on earlier albums- like these Rudy van Gelder jazz remakes. Wouldn’t that be lost? (it would.)

Aside from that, there is, like Smarty said, more satisfaction from buying a CD at a music store- seeing it all wrapped up, knowing that you will love what waits inside, ogling the liner notes and the art.

Then again, I am on dial up. If I had dsl, I might get a few tracks of singles I know I like but not enough to care that much about the quality, online- like funky crypto electronica music. Or TMBG

Last edited by rapscalious rob : 02-20-2005 at 10:43 PM.
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Old 02-21-2005, 08:08 PM   #24
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True there is some loss in highs and lows from compression but I've noticed that the m4p (no it's not a typo) format that iTunes uses greatly minimizes that loss. I do have to admit though: If there is a band that I absolutely love (i.e. incubus, tool, muse, 30 seconds to mars, certain movie soundtracks, etc...) i HAVE to go buy the CD. I can't help myself. I need that nastalgia that comes from walking out of the store with it.
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Old 02-22-2005, 04:51 AM   #25
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how do you obtain new musical product? I download it off KaZaa
do you buy cds like in days of yore? or do huh?
you download from itunes or somewhere?
we are thinking of releasing a cd, and really
want to know if anyone still buys them.
i would never buy a cd again, unless i knew it was worth it
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Old 02-23-2005, 01:57 AM   #26
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what do you consider worth while music?
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Old 03-05-2005, 02:18 AM   #27
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In today's paper...

The Age: One-track minds end the album

By Steve Dow
March 5, 2005

The death of the album is nigh. As Apple prepares to launch its iTunes online music store in Australia, with pay-per-track downloading, the song is about to be declared king. The concept of recording a year's output of 10 to 12 songs and putting them on an album is in terminal decline.

Today's young music buyers are not interested in suffering a pop group or artist's entire yearly quota of work, often recorded just to meet music label contractual obligations. Rather, they have surfed in on the crest of downloading technology, using MP3 digital files to choose the songs they want, and discarding the fodder filler.

Apple has launched its iTunes internet music store but has taken its time setting up the service in Australia. That is about to change. There are other legal pay-per-single music download services already established in Australia, but iTunes will rapidly become the market leader when it arrives, given its dominant market penetration of hardware music listening devices.

The arrival of the digital video disc has also taken the sheen off the album. DVDs of movies, concerts and music clips now share equal space with CDs in Australian music stores. This has already gone a step further in US stores: take a trip to music stores in, say, New York, Chicago or San Francisco, and you'll find about 60 per cent of the floor space devoted to DVDs. We're watching more and listening less, with DVDs capturing our limited attention spans at the expense of CDs.
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When Apple launches iTunes in Australia, the album will be given another swift kick in the vitals. Apple has sold 250-million downloadable songs worldwide to service its iPods. The company's Sydney office declined to comment on the date of the launch, but experts agree the service will appear soon.

Charting CD album sales trends is not always easy. Australian Record Industry Association figures show album sales fell in the first six months of 2004 by 10 per cent, and singles by 8.4 per cent. ARIA puts the album sales decline down to a slower-moving back catalogue - new titles still do well - and the growing retail space allocated to DVDs. But sales of CD albums were as traditionally high at Christmas as always. The biggest decline in CD album sales has been among those who share music files - mostly, those under 17 - but that group is getting older and growing, and so will their access when iTunes goes live, fitting snugly into the thousands of iPods now in circulation.

Rock historian Glenn A. Baker concedes he hadn't thought until now that it was time to declare the album dead. But, on reflection, he concedes the end is probably near.

The album really arrived in the mid to late '60s, with mid-period Beatles, says Baker. Before that, record buyers thought in terms of singles and songs. An album - say, The Sound of Music soundtrack - was a treat you received at Christmas. Then the Fab Four hit us with Rubber Soul and Revolver, and the thematic album - a unified body of a group or artist's work - was born.

The greatest example, says Baker, was Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The Beatles refused to lift any singles from the album: certainly, the singles Strawberry Fields and Penny Lane before Sgt Pepper's arrival hinted at the style to come, but by the time Pepper emerged, the Beatles had adopted the attitude that their concept album spoke for itself, and no three-minute cut was necessary. Other groups, such as Led Zeppelin, adopted the same snooty stance, at least in big markets such as Britain.

Baker says the album's heyday was really between 1965 and 1975. When CDs arrived in the 1980s, albums were dealt a blow: the quality of the cover art diminished to meet the packaging requirements of the then new technology, and the aesthetic of the CD case, as opposed to the cardboard cover, gave a hard edge to the product.

When Dire Straits' mega-selling Brothers in Arms was released in 1985, the album was still looking healthy. But it has been downhill ever since. The '90s yielded downloading services such as Napster, with which you could pick and choose songs, albeit illegally. Now, the multinational record companies are finally bowing to the looming descent of CD sales and co-operating with legal online music services to licence their songs for downloading.

Baker has charted the change in his own teenage children. They are back to thinking of songs again, like teenagers did before the Beatles got arty and changed the pop world. The mere idea that entertainers, bands, record companies or producers should choose what set of songs kids today want to hear is anathema: teenagers themselves will choose what they want, thanks very much.

Savvy artists have cottoned onto the internet's power: bands such as U2 and the Red Hot Chilli Peppers now regularly use the internet to float songs to gain audience reaction.

This triumph of songs over albums is not necessarily bad for artists, says Baker. They can now tailor their output to shorter bursts of better-quality songs. "Artists don't want to make 12 songs when they've only got four good ones in them," he says. The EP (extended play) seems to have re-emerged out of all this upheaval of quality over quantity: think of local artist Missy Higgins' recent success with three- and four-track EP CDs.

Have we really lost that much, given the album's sickly state? No, says Greg Borrowman, editor of Australian Hi-Fi: only a few bands ever produced true "concept" albums that were conceived like a novel, with each chapter adding to the story. Most albums, he says, have only ever had a few good tracks.

In many ways, says Borrowman, releasing tracks individually might be better for artists. "Rather than toil away all year writing and recording, then have all your songs released at once to quickly fade from public memory, artists could release a song each month and keep the pot boiling away, with a public keenly awaiting the next instalment - that's how Charles Dickens originally delivered his novels, after all."

Borrowman predicts more recording artists will become internet savvy. You might in future, he says, subscribe to a band's website, and instead of delivering a newsletter each month, they will automatically send you their latest song. Bands would be paid upfront, and gain a mailing list of people who like their music, while true fans would get new tracks before anyone else, without having to look out for news of a new song in the media.

Chris Green, a semi-retired musician who hosts a regional radio show and takes a big interest in the electronic delivery of songs, argues the aesthetic of the album is not dead yet. Most serious musicians, he says, like to create a significant body of work such as an album to put before the public. This can showcase their scope and versatility, creating a well-rounded picture of who they are, he says.

Some artists Green has interviewed are disillusioned that the work they put into deciding the song order of their albums, to create an "integrated feel or a musical journey", goes to waste when people buy or steal single tracks.

Still, lazy musicians have much to fear. When pay-per-track downloading becomes more available, says Green, "some artists will quickly learn what music lovers think of the typical 'three good tracks' CD".
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Old 03-05-2005, 09:56 AM   #28
craig johnston
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^^^^^
yes. and don't forget that before this whole album
thing there were singles, which captured the energy
of pop/rock n roll in a much more intense way than
long players.

the whole 'concept' album thing, kicked off by imo the
most over rated album of all time 'sgt peppers', was
responsible for some of the most indulgent and vacuous
music ever made.

i think the return to concentrating on songs is a positive
thing.
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Old 04-02-2005, 05:02 PM   #29
Trancefixcia
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I'm still one of the few that purchases all my cd's, but download's mp3's as well...Currently, I have over 700 cd's no telling on mp3's...and still waiting for the next new release of...New Order, and I need to get Electronic Skychurch which influenced the producer BT. I know, it would save me money to get mp3's like from itunes, but...I like having "everything"...the search for the cd at the store, the cover notes, and all the tracks. Even if the songs not all that good, it gives me idea's on production of my own tracks. I often do not purchase singles unless they have some really good mixes that can not be found on the full-version. Tuesday, best day of the week!!!
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